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February 2011 & Winter 2010-11  

  • February 2011 was a month of extremes!  From record snowfall and record cold temperatures at the beginning of the month, to record warm temperatures and a tornado at the end of the month.
  • A new All-Time State of Oklahoma 24-hour Snowfall Record was set in Spavinaw, OK on February 8-9, 2011.  A new All-Time State of Oklahoma Minimum Temperature Record was set in Nowata, OK on February 10, 2011.  Read the details about these records here.
  • A Blizzard and Major Winter Storm affected the region January 31-February 1, 2011.  Record breaking snowfall occurred with this storm.  Read about it here.
  • A Major Winter Storm affected the region February 8-9, 2011.  Record breaking snowfall and cold temperatures occurred with this storm.  Read about it here.
  • Additional Tulsa Snowfall Records broken during February 2011:
    • Record cold season snowfall of 26.1". Previous record 25.6" in 1923-24.
    • Record February snowfall of 22.5". Previous record 10.5" in February 2003.
    • Record Monthly snowfall (any month) of 22.5". Previous record 19.7" in March 1924.
    • Record 24-hour snowfall of 14.0" set on 01/31-02/01/2011. Previous record 12.9" on March 8-9, 1994.
    • Record Maximum Storm Total Snowfall of 14.0" set on 01/31-02/01/2011. Previous record 12.9" on March 8-9, 1994.
    • Record Maximum snowfall depth of 14.0" set on 2/02/2011. Previous record 11.0" January 7-8, 1988.
    • Record Calendar Snowfall for Any Day of 13.2" set on 2/01/2011.   Previous record 12.1" on March 8, 1994.
    • 2011 so far ties with 1924 as the 2nd snowiest year on record with 26.1". Current record is 29.6" in 1958.
  • Muskogee: The minimum temperature of -8°F that occurred on 2/10/2011 was the coldest temperature ever recorded in Muskogee during the month of February.
  • Record low temperatures on February 10, 2011 were followed by record warm temperatures only seven days later on February 17, 2011.  Temperatures made a 90°F -110°F swing only one week at many locations! The 7-day 110°F temperature change at the mesonet site in Nowata was the greatest such change within seven days in Oklahoma history.
  • Rainfall totals for February 2011 ranged from near 0.5” in portions of southeast OK to over 6” in portions of northwest AR.  Most of the HSA received 1” to 4” of rain this month.  Locations north of Hwy 412 in northeast OK and most of northwest and west central AR received near to over 200% of the normal February rainfall.  Elsewhere, rainfall totals were only 50% to 90% of the normal February values, with portions of Choctaw County recording less than 25% of the normal precipitation for the month.
  • According to the Drought Monitor from March 1, 2011, severe drought (D2) conditions were affecting most of Choctaw County.  Abnormally dry (D0) and moderate drought (D1) conditions were affecting the remainder of eastern Oklahoma and northwest Arkansas.  Despite the significant winter weather storms this month, drought conditions did not improve much due to the low snow snow to liquid equivalent ratios. 
  • According to the Oklahoma Climatological Survey (OCS) for the 30-day period Jan. 30 - Feb. 28, 2011, northeast OK ranked as the 20th wettest, east central OK ranked as the 38th wettest, and southeast OK ranked as the 30th driest period since records began in 1921. 
  • No rivers exceeded flood stage this month.
Winter 2010-11
  • Tulsa: Winter 2010-11 was 20th coldest (37.1°F; since 1905-06) and the 30th driest (3.69", tied with 1914-15; since 1888-89) Winter on record.
  • According to the Oklahoma Climatological Survey (OCS), northeast and east central OK ranked as the 11th driest and southeast OK ranked as the 10th driest Winter (Dec. 1 - Feb. 28) since records began in 1921.
Outlook
  • The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) outlook for March 2011 (issued February 28, 2011) indicates an enchanced chance for above average temperatures across eastern Oklahoma and northwest Arkansas.  This outlook also indicated a slightly enhanced chance for below median precipitation approximately southwest of a Tulsa to Fort Smith line, with an equal chance for above, near, and below median precipitation elsewhere.  Computer models indicate that moderate La Niña conditions are expected to continue through March.  The enhanced chance for above average temperatures for the 1-month outlook is consistent with La Niña impacts across the southern Plains.
  • For the 3-month period Mar-Apr-May 2011, CPC is forecasting an enhanced chance for above average temperatures and equal chances for above, near, and below median precipitation across eastern Oklahoma and northwest Arkansas (outlook issued February 17, 2011). The enhanced chance for above average temperatures for the 3-month outlook is consistent with La Niña impacts across the southern Plains. 
  • According to CPC, moderate La Niña conditions were observed at the end of February.  While negative sea surface temperature anomalies have begun to weaken in parts of the Pacific Ocean, current computer models indicate that La Niña conditions can still be expected to continue through the remainder of spring 2011.  However, La Niña or ENSO-neutral conditions are equally likely during May-June 2011.  A La Niña Advisory continues, meaning that La Niña conditions are observed and are expected to continue.

 

 


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