You are at: Weather History » Weather Events » May 3-4, 1999 Great Plains Tornado Outbreak » Satellite Imagery

Satellite
Imagery

Satellite Imagery Related to the
Great Plains Tornado Outbreak of May 3-4, 1999

NOAA/NWS Satellite Imagery

Visible image loop from the GOES-8 satellite showing the development of the supercells responsible for the tornado outbreak from 3:15-7:45 PM CDT on May 3, 1999.
Visible image loop from the GOES-8 satellite showing the development of the supercells
responsible for the tornado outbreak from 3:15-7:45 PM CDT on May 3, 1999.

Visible satellite image with surface observations over central Oklahoma
Visible satellite image with surface observations over central Oklahoma: Light gray over most of the image indicates the thunderstorm anvil. Areas of shadowing within the anvil show overshooting parcels of air at the tops of thunderstorm updrafts. The white arrow denotes the Oklahoma City storm.

Visible satellite image at 7:15 PM CDT on May 3, 1999 with the dryline position superimposed.
Visible satellite image at 7:15 PM CDT on May 3, 1999 with the dryline position superimposed.

NOAA-15 Polar Orbiter Satellite Polar Orbiter with a False Color Image at 8:10 PM CDT on May 3, 1999
NOAA-15 Polar Orbiter Satellite Polar Orbiter with a False Color Image at 8:10 PM CDT on May 3, 1999

Satellite Imagery from Cooperative Institute Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS)

The following satellite loops were created using imagery provided courtesy of the Cooperative Institute Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) which is located at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). Satellite images are still available from the original May 3, 1999 web page on the CIMSS GOES Gallery web page. This web page has since been replaced by the CIMSS Satellite Blog.

From the CIMSS web page: "GOES-8 visible and InfraRed (IR) imagery above show the explosive development of convection across southwestern Oklahoma after 3:45 PM CDT on May 3, 1999. Several overshooting tops are evident on the visible imagery, and an "Enhanced-V" signature was exhibited on the 10.7 micrometer IR imagery. A loop of 6.7 micrometer IR (water vapor) imagery shows the approach of an upper-level shortwave trough during the afternoon hours, and strong upper level divergence indicated that synoptic-scale upward vertical velocities were being enhanced as a jet streak moved across Oklahoma."

Visible Satellite Loop from 3:45-7:15 PM CDT on May 3, 1999
GOES-8 Visible Satellite Loop from 3:45-7:15 PM CDT on May 3, 1999

Water Vapor Satellite Loop from 3:45-11:45 PM CDT on May 3, 1999
GOES-8 10.7um Infrared (IR) Satellite Loop from 3:45-11:45 PM CDT on May 3, 1999

IR Satellite Loop from 11:45 AM-6:45 PM CDT on May 3, 1999
GOES-8 6.7 micrometer IR (Water Vapor) Satellite Loop from 11:45 AM-6:45 PM CDT on May 3, 1999



USA.gov is the U.S. government's official web portal to all federal, state and local government web resources and services.