The Supercell Tornado Outbreak Across Middle Tennessee January 24, 1997

Table of Contents

Staffing during the Event
Duties
Synopsis of the Event
Chronology of Products and Events
Storm Survey
Products Issued During the Event


Staffing during the Event

Position Employee Time on shift
Public Forecaster Scott Sharp 0800-1600
Aviation Forecaster Henry Steigerwaldt 0800-1800
Public/Aviation Forecaster Mark Richards 1600-2400
PUP (Radar Operator) Scott Sharp 0800-2000
Assistant PUP Operator Tim Troutman 0930-2100
Public Service Ralph Troutman 0800-1800
Public Service Chris Darden 0930-1900
RAOB/Public Service Mark Rose 1600-2400
Public Service Mike Murphy 0800-1800

Duties

Scott Sharp

Primarily responsible for WSR-88D operation/interpretation and warning decision-making. Made crucial phone call to Williamson County Sheriff, gathered reports, and performed some media interviews.

Henry Steigerwaldt

Assisted with composition of aviation forecasts (TAFs), monitored zone forecasts for middle Tennessee, and gathered reports of storm damage. Additionally conducted a storm survey and issued a public information statement giving the results the following day.

Mark Richards

Assisted with WSR-88D interpretation, gathered reports of storm damage, assisted with short term forecasts, amended zone forecasts, amended and composed aviation forecasts (TAF's), and composed area forecast discussion for upcoming zone forecast package.

Tim Troutman

Assisted with issuing and typing warnings. Assisted with short term forecasts (nowcasts), severe weather statements, local storm reports (LSRs), WSR-88D interpretation, gathered extensive reports of storm damage, and performed some media interviews.

 

Ralph Troutman

Broadcast National Weather Service watches and warnings on NOAA weather radio using the Quickwarn technique, and short-term forecasts.

Chris Darden

Primarily involved in typing warnings, assisted with short term forecasts, severe weather statements, gathered reports of storm damage, assisted with NOAA weather radio broadcasting, including watches and warnings.

Mark Rose

Performed upper air duties, assisted with NOAA Weather Radio broadcasting, including watches and warnings, assisted with short term forecasts and severe weather statements.

Mike Murphy

Assisted in gathering storm damage reports and coordinating HAM radio reports to staff. Additionally conducted a storm survey and issued a public information statement giving the results the following day.


Synopsis of the Event

The supercell tornado outbreak of January 24, 1997 resulted in 13 tornadoes across middle Tennessee. Damage in excess of 9 million dollars occurred across Rutherford, Cannon, Wilson, and Smith counties. Over 300 buildings, including homes, businesses, and public facilities were either damaged or completely destroyed. Thirty-one persons were injured as the tornadoes, ranging from F2 to F4 intensity, moved across this area. Incredibly, there were zero fatalities.

The threat of severe weather across middle Tennessee was first identified by the early afternoon of January 23. A special weather statement was issued to highlight the severe weather threat for middle Tennessee for the afternoon of January 24. Another special weather statement was issued early on January 24 to continue to alert the public of the possibility of severe weather.

The tornado outbreak unfolded quickly across middle Tennessee during the early afternoon of January 24. Shortly after 330 PM, Doppler radar indicated a tornado as severe weather spotters reported a funnel cloud just east of Centerville, Tennessee. A tornado warning was issued at 333 PM for northern Maury and Williamson Counties as the tornado moved toward the more heavily populated area of Franklin. By 344 PM, another tornado warning was issued for Maury County as another tornado was indicated by Doppler radar in western Maury County, about 15 miles west of Columbia.

Responsive to the seriousness of the event, a severe weather statement was issued at 404 PM highlighting that the tornado was expected to move through Boston, Thompson Station, Spring Hill, and to near the heavily populated area of Franklin by 430 PM. Short term forecasts (NOW's) were issued during the event, but were written in a broadbrush manner for the several counties warned and did not include specific storms. The NOW's were replaced by the severe weather statements (SVS's) to maintain public awareness of tornado locations and movements.

The public was heavily warned in Maury and Williamson Counties with both counties having a 37 minute lead time before large hail occurred at 410 PM. Additionally, phone calls were made to sheriffs' offices both to ensure the warnings were received and to exchange information regarding the tornadoes.

By 422 PM, a tornado warning was issued for Rutherford and extended for Williamson County until 515 PM. Three tornadoes were indicated by Doppler radar from about 10 miles northeast and 5 miles west of Franklin and also along the Maury-Williamson County line. Several weather spotters, amateur radio operators, and sheriffs' deputies were maintaining contact with NWSO Nashville and provided excellent updates of the tornadoes, which coincided with Doppler radar indications.

A very important severe weather statement was issued shortly after 430 PM highlighting the multiple tornadoes in Williamson County. This statement provided crucial information regarding areas within the Nashville metropolitan area which were in the paths of the tornadoes (including heavily populated areas such as Murfreesboro in Rutherford County).

At 440 PM, the northernmost tornado about 5 miles northeast of Franklin continued to maintain itself, prompting a tornado warning for Wilson county valid until 545 PM.

Another crucial severe weather statement was issued at 454 PM to indicate tornado locations and to pinpoint towns along the tornado paths. This particular statement mentioned that tornadoes would move to near Murfreesboro between 500 and 515 and to just southeast of Lebanon by 515 PM.

At around 500 PM, an F2 tornado touched down near Smyrna in Rutherford County and produced damage as it moved southeast of Lebanon in Wilson County to near Watertown in southeast Wilson County at the predicted 515 PM time. Rutherford County residents had a 48 minute tornado warning lead time and Wilson county a 20 minute lead time.

The tornado in southeast Williamson County moved to near Eagleville at 445 PM and continued its eastward track, evolving into a violent F4 tornado in the Barfield community at 503 PM. Because of the severity of this tornado, a crucial phone call was also made to the Rutherford County Sheriff to warn of the impending F4 tornado approaching the Murfreesboro area. Residents in the Barfield community had a 41 minute lead time. Because the time-saving NOAA Weather Radio (NWR) Quickwarn technique was employed by the NWSO Nashville staff, Rutherford and Williamson Counties received additional lead time as all media, local law enforcement, and many residents across middle Tennessee own weather radios. Extensive damage occurred in the Barfield community with the tornado virtually levelling the South Ridge subdivision.

A tornado warning was subsequently issued for Cannon county at 505 PM as numerous damage reports were received from southeast Rutherford County. The tornado lifted then touched down in northern Cannon county at 556 PM, producing widespread damage and a few injuries. The residents of Cannon County were also warned well in advance with a 51 minute lead time.

The media was greatly impressed with the actions taken by the NWSO Nashville staff. Television and radio personalities commented that the information received was accurate, timely, and life-saving during this destructive tornado event. The local Nashville television weathermen, Bill Hall, from the NBC affiliate WSMV-TV, Davis Nolan, from the ABC affiliate WKRN, and Ron Howes, from CBS affiliate WTVF, all praised the lead times provided the warned counties. Each of these personalities also publicly stated on air that if the warnings and statements had not been issued with as much lead time, the likelihood of deaths, because of the extensive damage which occurred across Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, and Cannon Counties would have been high.

Because of the long lead times that occurred with the issuance of these tornado warnings, staff members at NWSO Nashville were interviewed by NBC Nightly News (via telephone) and were complimented extensively by NBC Dateline. Local Nashville area radio stations and newspapers also publicly praised the quick and effective actions taken during the event. NWSO Nashville has received several letters and calls stating that the lead times and numerous updates of tornado positions and movements contributed to the prevention of deaths with this extensive and violent F2 and F4 tornado event. Tennessee Emergency Management (TEMA) also praised the quick, timely, and accurate actions taken by the NWSO Nashville staff during the event. A letter is also attached from TEMA.

It is rare that a tornado of such magnitude as F4 can pass through a heavily populated metropolitan area without causing fatalities. (The combined population of the three hardest hit counties, Williamson, Rutherford, and Wilson exceeds 267,000.) That no fatalities occurred on January 24 can be attributed in large to the enormous tornado warning lead times and crucial follow-up severe weather statements provided by the NWSO Nashville staff.

It must also be mentioned that a pro-active warning preparedness program involving the public paid off. Several instances were noted of individuals who had taken steps to protect themselves according to National Weather Service safety lessons. This factor surely contributed to the absence of deaths.


Chronology of Products and Events

January 23, 1997, 336 PM CST: A Special Weather Statement (SPS) was issued by the forecaster on duty highlighting the potential of severe weather for the next day (Friday, January 24th). The week prior to the severe weather event saw overnight temperatures in the single digits across middle Tennessee; thus, most folks' mind set was on winter weather. The forecaster on duty realized it was probably premature to alert the media and the public for the possibility of severe weather 24 hours in advance. But due to the recent cold snap and the possiblity of widespread severe thunderstorms, the forecaster thought an early "heads-up" was in order. A Special Weather Statement was issued by the forecaster at NEXRAD Weather Service Office Nashville (NWSO OHX) after consulting with the public forecaster at NEXRAD Weather Service Forecast Office Memphis (NWSFO MEM). The statement mentioned the possibility of damaging winds, large hail, and flood-producing rains.

January 24, 1997, 257 AM CST: The forecaster on duty at NWSO OHX issued another SPS reiterating potential for severe weather later in the day.

January 24, 1997, 952 AM CST: A Short Term Forecast (NOW) was issued, stating that showers and thunderstorms were expected to become widespread during the middle and late afternoon hours.

January 24, 1997, 1152 AM CST: Another NOW issued mentioning that showers and thunderstorms were expected to develop, especially after 2 or 3 pm.

January 24, 1997, 153 PM CST: A NOW was issued stating that thunderstorm coverage was increasing near the Tennessee River and that a line of thunderstorms was expected to extend from Nashville to Columbia by 4 pm.

January 24, 1997, 254 PM CST: The NOW updated information on severe thunderstorms producing large hail moving across western Middle Tennessee.

January 24, 1997, 301 PM CST: A thunderstorm southwest of Centerville in Hickman County rapidly intensified with strong rotation noted in the lowest elevation angle. A severe thunderstorm warning for Hickman County was upgraded to a tornado warning. Storm taking on supercell characteristics (referred to as Cell A throughout remainder of report). Another thunderstorm rapidly intensified over Perry County near Linden prompting issuance of a severe thunderstorm warning (referred to as Cell B throughout remainder of report).

January 24, 1997, 320 PM CST: A call to Lewis County sheriff office soliciting severe weather reports. Dispatch just received notification of golf ball size hail in Gordonsburg.

January 24, 1997, 332 PM CST: The NOW highlighted the arrival of thunderstorms in the Nashville metropolitan area by 430 PM CDT and stated that the storms had a history of producing large hail.

January 24, 1997, 344 PM CST: Cell B developed supercell characteristics with deepening meso-cyclone. Tornado warning issued for Maury County.

January 24, 1997, 345-420 PM CST: Two distinct supercells about 20 miles apart from each other moving northeast at 30 mph across sections of Williamson and Maury counties. Cell A produced a large quantity of dime size hail over western Williamson County. Cell B about 20 miles south-southwest of Cell A began producing large quantities of dime to penny size hail over northern Maury County. Solicitation call to Williamson County sheriff office yielded a recent report of quarter size hail at Cool Springs Galleria at 417 PM CDT (associated with cell A).

January 24, 1997, 422 PM CST: Due to persistent reports of large hail with the thunderstorms and strong rotational velocity couplets depicted by the 88D in the low and mid layers of the storms (both cell A and cell B), it was decided to go with a tornado warning for Rutherford County despite the lack of visual sightings or reports of damage. Warning specified that the cities of LaVergne, Smyrna, Murfreesboro and Eagleville were in the path of these storms.

January 24, 1997, 430 PM CST: Storm spotter near Cool Springs Galleria reported first visible sighting of a rotating wall cloud along with golf ball size hail. This event was asssociated with cell B.

January 24, 1997, 432 PM CST: Sighting of rotating wall cloud associated with cell B prompted issuance of a Severe Weather Statement, highlighting tornado threat to the cities of Eagleville and Murfreesboro.

January 24, 1997, 440 PM CST: Tornado Warning issued for Wilson County as possibly tornadic thunderstorm (cell A) in northern Rutherford County moving east-northeast. The warning stated that the cities of Gladeville, Lebanon and Watertown were in the path of this storm.

January 24, 1997, 441 PM CST: Storm spotter near Smyrna airport reported tornado one mile east of airport. This event was caused by cell A.

January 24, 1997. 442 PM CST: Amateur radio operator reported golf ball size hail in LaVergne (again, cell A).

January 24, 1997, 451 PM CST: Public reported marble size hail at junction of Interstate 24 and highway 840.

January 24, 1997, 454 PM CST: Severe Weather Statement issued stating that a tornado (cell B) would be in the Murfreesboro vicinity between 500 PM and 515 PM, while another tornado (cell A) would be southeast of Lebanon by 515 PM.

January 24, 1997, 503 PM CST: Storm spotter just south of Murfreesboro reported 4 to 5 funnel clouds with one touching the ground producing debris.

January 24, 1997, 505 PM CST: Tornado Warning issued for Cannon County. Warning mentioned storm spotter report of tornado just south of Murfreesboro and that tornado would affect the areas around Auburntown and Woodbury by 530 PM.

January 24, 1997, 510 PM CST: Tornado Warning issued for Smith County. Warning stated that tornado would be in the Gordonsville vicinity by 540 PM and had a history of producing extensive damage.

January 24, 1997, 518 PM CST: The Rutherford County sheriff office reported injuries in Murfreesboro and Smyrna along with extensive damage across the county.

January 24, 1997, 532 PM CST: Tornado warning issued for DeKalb County due to persistent tornadic signature and reports of damage near Murfreesboro. Warning stated that tornado would move to Smithville and Dowelltown by 550 PM.

January 24, 1997, 536 PM CST: Tornado warning issued for Jackson and Putnam counties. Warning stated that tornado would be between Baxter and Gainesboro by 600 PM.

January 24, 1997, 547 PM CST: Severe Weather Statement issued stating that a tornado was located by Doppler radar about 20 miles west of Cookeville near Interstate 40 moving towards the towns of Baxter, Bloomington Springs and Center Grove by 6 PM.


Storm Survey

Officials of the National Weather Service Office in Nashville conducted a survey of the tornado that heavily damaged the community of Barfield and the South Ridge subdivision, both located about 5 miles south of downtown Murfreesboro.

Although there were a number of severe storms that occurred across middle Tennessee during the afternoon and evening of Friday, January 24, a survey was conducted on this storm as it appeared to produce the most damage. The National Weather Service estimated the tornado intensity based on damage characteristics to be F4 (207 mph to 260 mph) on the Fujita tornado intensity scale. The scale ranges from F0 to F5, with F5 being the strongest.

The tornado first touched down on Yeargan Road, about 6 miles southwest of downtown Murfreesboro, with an intensity of F1 (73 mph to 112 mph) and a width of about 100 yards. At this location, a sheet metal roof was peeled back on a barn and a couple of trees were snapped. A nearby trailer was also lifted off its foundation and overturned and several trees were uprooted.

The tornado proceeded northeast and increased to F2 (113 mph to 157 mph) and a width of 300 yards. As it struck the community of Barfield, an entire roof was lifted off a house, several homes were partially destroyed and a barn totally destroyed.

The tornado crossed the west fork of Stones River and then struck the South Ridge subdivision as it increased to its maximum intensity of F4 (207 mph to 260 mph) with its width remaining at 300 yards. A number of homes were partially damaged with about a half dozen homes totally destroyed.

The tornado then struck a large apartment complex just west of U.S. Highway 231 on the south side of Murfreesboro, producing some structural damage and extensive roof damage as it weakened to F1 (73 mph to 112 mph) intensity and its width decreasing to 150 yards.

The tornado then crossed U.S. Highway 231 and the Indian Wells golf course. Large trees were uprooted and structural damage to several businesses occurred as it approached Interstate 24. The tornado continued moving northeastward across Interstate 24, snapping and uprooting trees as it narrowed to 50 yards wide.

On the southeast side of Murfreesboro near the intersections of Elam Road and U.S. Highway 41, and near Bradyville Road and East Rutherford Boulevard, the tornado uprooted numerous trees and damaged the roofs of several homes. It was at this point the track of the tornado ended.

The path length was estimated at about 6.5 miles.


Products Issued During the Event

Special Weather Statement, the previous afternoon

ZCZC MEMSPSOHX
TTAA00 KOHX DDHHMM
TNZ005>011-022>033-055>065-075>082-093>098-240340-

SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NASHVILLE TN
336 PM CST THU JAN 23 1997

...SEVERE WEATHER STATEMENT IS POSSIBLE OVER MIDDLE TENNESSEE ON FRIDAY...

THERE IS THE CHANCE THAT SEVERE WEATHER WILL THREATEN MIDDLE TENNESSEE FRIDAY AS A STRONG STORM SYSTEM APPROACHES FROM THE PLAINS. A DEEPENING AREA OF LOW PRESSURE WILL BRING GULF MOISTURE INTO THE REGION ON GUSTY SOUTH WINDS. THIS WILL CAUSE THE AIR MASS OVER MIDDLE TENNESSEE TO BECOME UNSTABLE AS THE COLD FRONT NEARS.

THE FIRST CHANCE OF SEVERE WEATHER WILL BE IN WESTERN MIDDLE TENNESSEE SHORTLY AFTER DAYBREAK. ANOTHER CHANCE FOR SEVERE WEATHER WILL OCCUR FRIDAY AFTERNOON INTO FRIDAY EVENING AS THE COLD FRONT MOVES THROUGH THE AREA. IT APPEARS THE GREATEST RISK FROM THESE STORMS WILL LIKELY BE DAMAGING WINDS AND LARGE HAIL.

ANOTHER PROBLEM RESIDENTS MIGHT ENCOUNTER WILL BE THE POSSIBILITY OF FLASH FLOODING. THE GROUND SHOULD BE NEARLY SATURATED DUE TO THE RAIN ON WEDNESDAY AND THE RAIN EXPECTED OVERNIGHT. THEREFORE...THE THUNDERSTORMS THAT MOVE THROUGH FRIDAY COULD CAUSE LOCALIZED FLOODING AND PONDING OF WATER ON ROADWAYS.

STAY TUNED TO RELIABLE SOURCES OF WEATHER INFORMATION FOR THE LATEST ON THIS DEVELOPING WEATHER SITUATION.

Special Weather Statement, the morning of the event

ZCZC MEMSPSOHX
TTAA00 KOHX DDHHMM
TNZ005>011-022>033-055>065-075>082-093>098-241700-

SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NASHVILLE TN
257 AM CST FRI JAN 24 1997

...SEVERE WEATHER A POSSIBILITY IN MIDDLE TENNESSEE TODAY AND EARLY TONIGHT...

A DEEPENING LOW PRESSURE AREA IN OKLAHOMA THIS MORNING HAS BROUGHT GULF MOISTURE NORTHWARD INTO MIDDLE TENNESSEE WITH HEAVY RAINFALL AT TIMES. WITH THE GROUND ALREADY SATURATED SOME LOCALIZED FLASH FLOODING IS POSSIBLE ESPECIALLY ACROSS THE WESTERN AND SOUTHERN PARTS OF THE MID STATE THIS MORNING.

BY EARLY AFTERNOON THE LOW PRESSURE AREA WILL MOVE INTO MISSOURI PLACING MIDDLE TENNESSEE WELL WITHIN THE WARM SECTOR OF THE STORM SYSTEM AND WITH THE APPROACH OF THE COLD FRONT THUNDERSTORMS WILL DEVELOP DURING THE AFTERNOON HOURS IN MIDDLE TENNESSEE AND CONTINUE INTO THE EVENING. SOME OF THESE STORMS COULD BECOME SEVERE WITH LARGE HAIL AND DAMAGING WINDS, FLASH FLOODING WILL ALSO BE POSSIBLE WITH THESE STORMS.

STAY TUNED TO A RELIABLE SOURCE OF WEATHER INFORMATION FOR THE LATEST ON THIS DEVELOPING WEATHER SITUATION.

Tornado Warning for Northern Maury and Williamson Counties (333 PM) - Lead Time 37 Minutes

ZCZC MEMTOROHX ALL 242230
TTAA00 KOHX DDHHMM
TNZ119-187-242230-

BULLETIN - EAS AVTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NASHVILLE TN
333 PM CST FRI JAN 24 1997

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN NASHVILLE HAS ISSUED A TORNADO WARNING EFFECTIVE UNTIL 430 PM CST FOR PEOPLE IN THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS...

IN MIDDLE TENNESSEE

...NORTHERN MAURY COUNTY...WILLIAMSON COUNTY

A TORNADO JUST EAST OF CENTERVILLE WILL MOVE NORTHEAST AT 30 MILES AN HOUR TOWARD THE COMMUNITIES OF SANTA FE...LEIPERS FORK...AND FRANKLIN THROUGH 430 PM.

THIS IS A DANGEROUS STORM SITUATION. ACT QUICKLY. IF YOU ARE IN THE PATH OF THIS TORNADO MOVE TO A SHELTER BELOW GROUND IF AVAILABLE. OTHERWISE...GO TO A SMALL INTERIOR ROOM ON THE LOWEST FLOOR POSSIBLE. AVOID WINDOWS. ABANDON CARS AND MOBILE HOMES FOR A REINFORCED BUILDING OR GET INTO A DITCH OR CULVERT.

Tornado Warning for Maury County (344 PM) - Lead Time 16 Minutes

ZCZC MEMTOROHX ALL 242230
TTAA00 KOHX DDHHMM
TNZ119-242230-

BULLETIN - EAS AVTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NASHVILLE TN
344 PM CST FRI JAN 24 1997

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN NASHVILLE HAS ISSUED A TORNADO WARNING EFFECTIVE UNTIL 430 PM CST FOR PEOPLE IN THE FOLLOWING LOCATION...

IN MIDDLE TENNESSEE

...MAURY COUNTY

DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED TWO POSSIBLE TORNADOES IN MAURY COUNTY. ONE TORNADO NEAR SANTA FE WILL MOVE NORTHEAST AT 30 MILES AN HOUR. ANOTHER TORNADO 15 MILES WEST OF COLUMBIA NEAR CROSS BRIDGES WILL MOVE THROUGH COLUMBIA.

IF YOU ARE IN THE PATH OF A TORNADO...THE SAFEST PLACE IS A BASEMENT. GET UNDER A WORKBENCH OR PIECE OF STURDY FURNITURE. IF NO BASEMENT IS AVAILABLE...SEEK SHELTER IN AN INTERIOR ROOM SUCH AS A CLOSET ON THE LOWEST FLOOR. USE BLANKETS...PILLOWS...OR CUSHIONS TO COVER YOUR BODY. AVOID WINDOWS.

Severe Weather Statement (404 PM)

ZCZC MEMSVSOHX ALL 242245
TTAA00 KOHX DDHHMM
TNZ060-059-242245-

SEVERE WEATHER STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NASHVILLE TN
404 PM CST FRI JAN 24 1997

A TORNADO NEAR SANTA FE WILL MOVE NORTHEAST TOWARD BOSTON...THOMPSON STATION...SPRING HILL AND NEAR FRANKLIN THROUGH 430 PM CST. IF YOU ARE IN THE PATH OF THIS STORM TAKE COVER IMMEDIATELY.

Tornado Warning for Rutherford and Williamson Counties (422 PM) - Lead Times 41 and 48 Minutes, Respectively

ZCZC MEMTOROHX ALL 242315
TTAA00 KOHX DDHHMM
TNZ149-187-242315

BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NASHVILLE TN
422 PM CST FRI JAN 24 1997

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN NASHVILLE HAS ISSUED A TORNADO WARNING EFFECTIVE UNTIL 515 PM CST FOR PEOPLE IN THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS...

IN MIDDLE TENNESSEE

...RUTHERFORD COUNTY...WILLIAMSON COUNTY

SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS WITH POSSIBLE TORNADOES WERE LOCATED 10 MILES NORTHEAST OF FRANKLIN...ANOTHER NEAR I-65 ON THE MAURY- WILLIAMSON COUNTY LINE...AND YET ANOTHER 5 MILES WEST OF FRANKLIN. THESE TORNADOES ARE MOVING NORTHEAST AT 35 MILES AN HOUR TOWARD THE TOWNS OF LAVERGNE...SMYRNA...MURFREESBORO... EAGLEVILLE...FRANKLIN...AND BRENTWOOD. TAKE COVER IMMEDIATELY.

IF YOU ARE IN THE PATH OF A TORNADO...THE SAFEST PLACE IS A BASEMENT. GET UNDER A WORKBENCH OR PIECE OF STURDY FURNITURE. IF NO BASEMENT IS AVAILABLE...SEEK SHELTER IN AN INTERIOR ROOM SUCH AS A CLOSET ON THE LOWEST FLOOR. USE BLANKETS...PILLOWS...OR CUSHIONS TO COVER YOUR BODY. AVOID WINDOWS.

Severe Weather Statement (432 PM)

ZCZC MEMSVSOHX ALL 242315
TTAA00 KOHX DDHHMM
TNZ026-027-062-008-059-028-242315-

SEVERE WEATHER STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NASHVILLE TN
432 PM CST FRI JAN 24 1997

DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED A TORNADO IN SOUTHEAST WILLIAMSON COUNTY NEAR COTTAGE GROVE...ANOTHER TORNADO NEAR NOLENSVILLE...AND YET ANOTHER TORNADO JUST NORTH OF FRANKLIN. THESE TORNADOES ARE LIKELY TO AFFECT EASTERN AND SOUTHERN PARTS OF THE NASHVILLE METRO AREA INCLUDING THE PERCY PRIEST AREA AND ANTIOCH AS WELL AS THE TOWNS OF EAGLEVILLE AND MURFREESBORO IN RUTHERFORD COUNTY.

IF YOU ARE IN THE PATH OF THESE STORMS...YOU SHOULD TAKE SHELTER WHILE YOU STILL CAN.

Tornado Warning for Wilson County (440 PM) - Lead Time 20 Minutes

ZCZC MEMTOROHX ALL 242345
TTAA00 KOHX DDHHMM
TNZ189-242345

BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NASHVILLE TN
440 PM CST FRI JAN 24 1997

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN NASHVILLE HAS ISSUED A TORNADO WARNING EFFECTIVE UNTIL 545 PM CST FOR PEOPLE IN THE FOLLOWING LOCATION...

IN MIDDLE TENNESSEE

...WILSON COUNTY

DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED A POSSIBLE TORNADO ON THE DAVIDSON- RUTHERFORD COUNTY LINE NEAR PERCY PRIEST LAKE MOVING NORTHEAST AT 35 MILES AN HOUR. THIS TORNADO WILL MOVE THROUGH THE COMMUNITIES OF GLADESVILLE...LEBANON...AND WATERTOWN. A SKYWARN SPOTTER REPORTED GOLF BALL SIZE HAIL WITH THIS STORM IN LAVERGNE. YOU SHOULD TAKE COVER IMMEDIATELY.

THIS IS A DANGEROUS STORM SITUATION. ACT QUICKLY. IF YOU ARE IN THE PATH OF THIS TORNADO MOVE TO A SHELTER BELOW GROUND IF AVAILABLE, OTHERWISE...GO TO A SMALL INTERIOR ROOM ON THE LOWEST FLOOR POSSIBLE. AVOID WINDOWS. ABANDON CARS AND MOBILE HOMES FOR A REINFORCED BUILDING OR GET INTO A DITCH OR CULVERT.

Severe Weather Statement (454 PM)

ZCZC MEMSVSOHX
TTAA00 KOHX DDHHMM
TNZ027-062-059-028-242345

SEVERE WEATHER STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NASHVILLE TN
454 PM CST FRI JAN 24 1997

...TORNADO WARNINGS REMAIN IN EFFECT FOR DAVIDSON COUNTY UNTIL 5 PM CST...WILLIAMSON AND RUTHERFORD COUNTIES UNTIL 515 PM AND WILSON COUNTY UNTIL 545 PM...

A TORNADO WILL MOVE EAST TO NEAR MURFREESBORO BETWEEN 5 AND 515 PM. ANOTHER TORNADO WILL MOVE TO JUST SOUTHEAST OF LEBANON BY 515 PM. YOU CAN ALSO EXPECT TO SEE LARGE HAIL IN THESE AREAS IN EXCESS OF GOLFBALL SIZE. A TORNADO WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT FOR MOST OF MIDDLE TENNESSEE UNTIL 10 PM.

Tornado Warning for Cannon County (505 PM) - Lead Time 51 Minutes

ZCZC MEMTOROHX ALL 250000
TTAA00 KOHX DDHHMM
TNZ015-250000-

BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NASHVILLE TN
505 PM CST FRI JAN 24 1997

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN NASHVILLE HAS ISSUED A TORNADO WARNING EFFECTIVE UNTIL 600 PM CST FOR PEOPLE IN THE FOLLOWING LOCATION...

IN MIDDLE TENNESSEE

...CANNON COUNTY

A STORM SPOTTER REPORTED A TORNADO JUST SOUTH OF MURFREESBORO AT 505 PM MOVING NORTHEAST AT 35 MILES AN HOUR. THIS TORNADO WILL APPROACH WOODBURY AND AUBURNTOWN BY 530 PM. THIS STORM ALSO HAS A HISTORY OF PRODUCING LARGE HAIL. TAKE COVER IMMEDIATELY.

IF YOU ARE IN THE PATH OF A TORNADO...THE SAFEST PLACE IS A BASEMENT. GET UNDER A WORKBENCH OR PIECE OF STURDY FURNITURE. IF NO BASEMENT IS AVAILABLE...SEEK SHELTER IN AN INTERIOR ROOM SUCH AS A CLOSET ON THE LOWEST FLOOR. USE BLANKETS...PILLOWS...OR CUSHIONS TO COVER YOUR BODY. AVOID WINDOWS.

Tornado Warning for Smith County (510 PM) - Lead Time 20 Minutes

ZCZC MEMTOROHX ALL 250000
TTAA00 KOHX DDHHMM
TNZ159-250000-

BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NASHVILLE TN
510 PM CST FRI JAN 24 1997

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN NASHVILLE HAS ISSUED A TORNADO WARNING EFFECTIVE UNTIL 600 PM CST FOR PEOPLE IN THE FOLLOWING LOCATION...

IN MIDDLE TENNESSEE

...SMITH COUNTY

AT 510 PM...A TORNADO NEAR WATERTOWN MOVING NORTHEAST AT 35 MILES AN HOUR WILL MOVE TOWARD GORDONSVILLE BY 540 PM. THIS STORM HAS A HISTORY OF PRODUCING EXTENSIVE DAMAGE. TAKE COVER NOW.

IF YOU ARE IN THE PATH OF A TORNADO...THE SAFEST PLACE IS A BASEMENT. GET UNDER A WORKBENCH OR PIECE OF STURDY FURNITURE. IF NO BASEMENT IS AVAILABLE...SEEK SHELTER IN AN INTERIOR ROOM SUCH AS A CLOSET ON THE LOWEST FLOOR. USE BLANKETS...PILLOWS...OR CUSHIONS TO COVER YOUR BODY. AVOID WINDOWS.

Tornado Warning for Eastern Rutherford County (511 PM) - Lead Time 19 Minutes

ZCZC MEMTOROHX ALL 242345
TTAA00 KOHX DDHHMM
TNZ149-242345-

BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NASHVILLE TN
511 PM CST FRI JAN 24 1997

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN NASHVILLE HAS ISSUED A TORNADO WARNING EFFECTIVE UNTIL 545 PM CST FOR PEOPLE IN THE FOLLOWING LOCATION...

IN MIDDLE TENNESSEE

...EASTERN RUTHERFORD COUNTY

A TORNADO 5 MILES EAST OF MURFREESBORO WILL MOVE THROUGH MILTON BY 530 PM.

IF YOU ARE IN THE PATH OF A TORNADO...THE SAFEST PLACE IS A BASEMENT. GET UNDER A WORKBENCH OR PIECE OF STURDY FURNITURE. IF NO BASEMENT IS AVAILABLE...SEEK SHELTER IN AN INTERIOR ROOM SUCH AS A CLOSET ON THE LOWEST FLOOR. USE BLANKETS...PILLOWS...OR CUSHIONS TO COVER YOUR BODY. AVOID WINDOWS.


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