Heavy Snowfall in the Mountains: February 11-12, 2006


Event Overview:

Surface plot image at 7 am EST on February 11, 2006.
Surface plot image at 7 am EST on February 11, 2006.

A low pressure system developed over the Deep South on Saturday morning (February 11th) and moved northeast across the Carolinas during the afternoon. This system brought moisture across the southern Appalachian region as colder air moved into east Tennessee and southwest Virginia. A combination of above-freezing surface temperatures and warm ground temperatures (resulting from a warm January) caused the initial snowfall Saturday morning to melt across the valley areas. Thus, snowfall totals were not as much as anticipated in the valleys. However, six to ten inches of snow were reported across the higher elevations (generally above 2500 feet) by Saturday afternoon.

Surface plot image at 1 pm EST on February 11, 2006.
Surface plot image at 1 pm EST on February 11, 2006.

As this surface low moved up the Atlantic seaboard, much colder air aloft (around 10,000 to 20,000 feet MSL) moved across the southern Appalachian region Saturday night. This colder aloft caused additional snow showers to continue Saturday night into Sunday. As surface temperatures fell below freezing Saturday night, light snowfall accumulations of one to three inches were reported across most of the valley areas Sunday morning. Heavy snowfall was again reported across the higher elevations, with storm total accumulations through Sunday night exceeding three feet at Mount LeConte in the Smokies!

Snowfall totals as of Monday morning February 13, 2006.
Snowfall totals as of Monday morning, February 13, 2006.


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