Monthly Storm Reports and Storm Data
Storm Reports
Are you interested in what happened during a recent event? Check out the report below.
 
Severe Storms/Heavy Rain on June 5-10, 2014
 
A ridge of high pressure ("H") was centered over Texas on 06/06/2014.
June began with a ridge of high pressure setting up over the southwest United States and nudging into Arkansas. A high like this brings heat and keeps the rain away in summer. That was the case on the 3rd and 4th, with temperatures in the 80s to lower 90s and no umbrellas needed.
In the picture: A ridge of high pressure ("H") was centered over Texas on 06/06/2014.

 

A front was nearly stationary in northern Arkansas at 100 pm CDT on 06/05/2014.
In the picture: A front was nearly stationary in northern Arkansas at 100 pm CDT on 06/05/2014. The front separated very warm and humid conditions to its south from slightly cooler/drier air farther north. This created an unstable environment along the front, and a focus for thunderstorm development.
 

On the 5th, the high weakened just enough to allow a cold front to drift into the region from the north. The front was nearly parallel to the flow aloft (aligned west to east), and this gave the front little if any push. The front eventually stalled, and was not expected to move much for several days. Clusters of storms were projected to form along the front, with rounds of severe weather and heavy rain.

 

The first round of storms arrived during the morning of the 5th, and tracked through the northern counties. Strong to damaging winds downed trees and power lines from Mountain Home (Baxter County) southeast toward Batesville (Independence County) and Jonesboro (Craighead County). A 74 mph gust was measured at Swifton (Jackson County), with a 70 mph gust at Blytheville (Mississippi County). The storms were responsible for at least 30,000 power outages.
A large cluster of showers and thunderstorms surged through the northern two to three rows of counties during the late morning of 06/05/2014.
In the picture: A large cluster of showers and thunderstorms surged through the northern two to three rows of counties during the late morning of 06/05/2014.

 

Unfortunately, there were two fatalities reported. A tree fell on a van at Black Rock (Lawrence County) and trapped people inside. One person was killed. At Jonesboro (Craighead County), a tree hit a house and killed the occupant.

 

After a brief lull, round two followed the front out of the Plains and into Arkansas on the 6th. This time, the target area was the central third of the state.
In the pictures: The satellite showed storms advancing quickly eastward through Arkansas from 930 am to 330 pm CDT on 06/06/2014.

 

Much like round one, the story was the wind. Gusts exceeded 60 mph from Mena (Polk County) to Little Rock (Pulaski County). Trees were toppled and there were power failures. Highway 246 was blocked by trees near Vandervoort (Polk County). The same was true along Highway 93 east of Hattieville (Conway County) and Highway 60 around Bigelow (Perry County). A 66 mph gust was clocked at Oil Trough (Independence County). At Sherwood (Pulaski County), an estimated 65 mph gust blew windows in at a car dealership.

At Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County), a boat capsized as thunderstorm winds increased. A fisherman was thrown into the water and drowned.

On the north side of Batesville (Independence County), a brief tornado was spawned (rated EF1). Several businesses had mainly roof damage, with some exterior wall damage at a flooring company. Cars were piled up in a parking lot at a child care center. A couple of people were injured.

 

 

South of Beedeville (Jackson County), another tornado (EF1) tornado was identified. The tornado destroyed an old airport hangar and ripped apart a shop building. Pieces of the building were spread across adjacent farm fields for up to a quarter mile.

 

 

Thunderstorms flared up in Missouri ahead of a Mesoscale Convective Vortex (MCV) at 1215 pm CDT on 06/07/2014.
In the picture: Thunderstorms flared up in Missouri ahead of a Mesoscale Convective Vortex (MCV) at 1215 pm CDT on 06/07/2014. The MCV was a spinning feature that was leftover from a weakening thunderstorm complex in the Plains. Such an MCV often triggers new thunderstorm clusters.
By 415 pm CDT, storms were going in Arkansas surrounding the MCV.
In the picture: By 415 pm CDT, storms were going in Arkansas surrounding the MCV.
 

There was no letup on the 7th. Again, storms affected northern and central Arkansas, and avoided the south. This time, there was hail. Half dollar size stones pelted Glen Rose (Hot Spring County), with quarter size hail at Perryville (Perry County) and Petit Jean State Park (Conway County). Wind was also a problem. The hardest hit areas were between Clarendon and Holly Grove (both in Monroe County) and at Gifford (Hot Spring County). Numerous trees were pushed over at these locations, with some trees on houses.

 

On the 8th, the aforementioned front wobbled toward the Louisiana border. North of the front, clouds and areas of rain created mild conditions (temperatures in the 60s/70s). It was much warmer in the extreme south, and this is where severe storms tended to bubble up. Half dollar size hail was reported at El Dorado (Union County). At Moro Bay State Park (Bradley County), there was quarter size hail. One other storm unleashed 63 mph gusts close to Benton (Saline County), with several trees uprooted and tree limbs snapped. Temperatures at 400 pm CDT on 06/08/2014.
In the picture: Temperatures at 400 pm CDT on 06/08/2014. North of a front, it was mild (readings in the 60s/70s) with clouds and areas of rain in northern/central Arkansas. It was much warmer (readings in the 80s/90s) farther south.

 

The front stayed put in the south through the 9th. Southern locales got a deluge, with some of the heaviest rain experienced anywhere during this event. In the twenty four hour time frame ending at 700 pm CDT on the 9th, Texarkana (Miller County) got 3.90 inches, with 3.55 inches at Monticello (Drew County). Funnel clouds were witnessed at Wiville and just east of McCrory (both in Woodruff County), but no tornadoes were confirmed.

 

One hundred twenty hour (five day) through 700 pm CDT on 06/09/2014.
In the picture: One hundred twenty hour (five day) rainfall through 700 pm CDT on 06/09/2014.
 

For the one hundred twenty hour (five day) period through 700 pm CDT on the 9th, widespread two to four inch amounts were common across the state. Local totals exceeded five inches. The northwest got the least rain. Fayetteville (Washington County), for example, only had 0.81 inch.

 

A storm system ("L") at 500 millibars (18,000 feet) brought colder air aloft toward Arkansas late on 06/09/2014.
The event ended with a storm system aloft moving over Arkansas from the west on the 10th. This time, precipitation was scattered, with a mix of clouds and sun. As the system arrived, temperatures got progressively colder overhead. This made the air below more buoyant, and rising currents created cauliflower clouds and hit and miss showers. Fayetteville (Washington County) and Jonesboro (Craighead County) still managed to tally over an inch of rain.
In the picture: A storm system ("L") at 500 millibars (18,000 feet) brought colder air aloft toward Arkansas late on 06/09/2014. Temperatures (in degrees C) are dashed white lines.

 

Storm Reports
There were numerous reports of wind damage, hail, flash flooding and funnel clouds on June 5th through the 9th, 2014. For a look at some reports, click here.
 
Link of Interest
Plot Reports
Preliminary reports of severe weather in the Little Rock County Warning Area on June 5-9, 2014 (in red).
Submit a storm report.
In the picture: Preliminary reports of severe weather and flash flooding in the Little Rock County Warning Area on June 5-9, 2014 (in red).

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