Climate Data
Yearly Reports
Interested in what kind of weather occurred in a recent year? Check out the most memorable events below.
 
Severe Weather/Heavy Rain on April 10-11, 2013 (Pg1)
 
A cold front pushed into Arkansas from the Plains on 04/10/2013.

Speaking of severe weather, it had been a slow year thus far through March with only six tornadoes spawned (mostly weak). The pace picked up on April 10th. A strong cold front swept into Arkansas, and touched off scattered to numerous showers and thunderstorms.

In the picture: A cold front pushed into Arkansas from the Plains on 04/10/2013. Temperatures varied more than 40 degrees across the front.

 

Ahead of the front, instability increased as temperatures climbed into the 70s/lower 80s. This made thunderstorms more likely to pop up. Winds also turned with height, which increased the chances that a few storms would produce tornadoes.

There was at least a 90 percent chance that 0-1 km Helicity (representing the potential for rotating winds) would reach at least 150 m2/s2 and CAPE (Convective Available Potential Energy...or a measure of instability) would make it to 1000 J/kg during the late afternoon of 04/10/2013.
In the picture: There was at least a 90 percent chance that 0-1 km Helicity (representing the potential for rotating winds) would reach at least 150 m2/s2 and CAPE (Convective Available Potential Energy...or a measure of instability) would make it to 1000 J/kg during the late afternoon of 04/10/2013. These values were more than ample for severe weather. Tornadoes were most likely where these two indices overlapped.

 

The sounding (temperature and dewpoint profile with height) showed an inversion (rising temperatures with height) blocking air parcels from below at 700 am CDT on 04/10/ 2013.
In the picture: The sounding (temperature and dewpoint profile with height) showed an inversion (rising temperatures with height) blocking air parcels from below at 700 am CDT on 04/10/ 2013. At this point, the atmosphere was capped.
While the cap still existed at 100 pm CDT, it had weakened and air parcels were allowed to move skyward to make storm clouds.
In the picture: While the cap still existed at 100 pm CDT, it had weakened and air parcels were allowed to move skyward to make storm clouds.
 

The only problem was capping. The day before, warm conditions aloft prevented air below from ascending, so thunderstorms had a tough time developing ahead of the front across the central and southern Plains. Instead, storms mostly formed along and behind the front in cool and more stable air. This kept severe storms to a minimum.

 

The satellite showed thunderstorms erupting from the Ohio Valley to the mid-South at 145 pm CDT on 04/10/2013.

While there was some capping on the 10th, the cap weakened enough during the afternoon to allow a few pre-frontal storms to grow in a warm, moist and unstable environment. One of the storms removed the roof of a barn near Wonderview (Conway County). It was determined that straight-line winds were responsible for this incident. After that, there was strong rotation at times within the storm, and tornadoes became a concern.

In the picture: The satellite showed thunderstorms erupting from the Ohio Valley to the mid-South at 145 pm CDT on 04/10/2013.

 

The storm went on to drop three tornadoes in a three county area. The first of these (rated EF2) was spawned about 3.4 miles southeast of Scotland (Van Buren County).

A storm showed supercell (storm with rotating updrafts) characteristics, with a hook echo and possible tornado approaching Scotland (Van Buren County) from the south at 411 pm CDT on 04/10/2013.
In the picture: A storm showed supercell (storm with rotating updrafts) characteristics, with a hook echo and possible tornado approaching Scotland (Van Buren County) from the south at 411 pm CDT on 04/10/2013.

 

Storm Lead Times
A Tornado Warning was issued for portions of Van Buren County at 409 pm CDT on 04/10/2013. This gave residents near Scotland (Van Buren County) close to 15 minutes to prepare for the tornado that eventually materialized. At Botkinburg (Van Buren County), the lead time was an impressive 35 minutes!

 

The WSR-88D (Doppler Weather Radar) showed strengthening rotation to the southeast of Scotland (Van Buren County) around 420 pm CDT on 04/10/2013.

The tornado tracked 17.4 miles and finally dissipated roughly 5 miles east-northeast of Botkinburg (Van Buren County) in the Plant community.

In the picture: The WSR-88D (Doppler Weather Radar) showed strengthening rotation to the southeast of Scotland (Van Buren County) around 420 pm CDT on 04/10/2013. A tornado quickly developed, and tracked through areas west of Clinton (Van Buren County) and just south of Botkinburg (Van Buren County).

 

Link of Interest
More About Rotation

 

More Information
 
There is more concerning severe weather and heavy rain on April 10th/11th. To check out the rest of the story, click here.

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