Climate Data
Yearly Reports
Interested in what kind of weather occurred in a recent year? Check out the most memorable events below.
 
Severe Weather in Apr 2006 (1st-3rd/Pg1)
 
The WSR-88D (Doppler Weather Radar) showed scattered severe storms developing across the central third of Arkansas at 515 pm CST on 04/01/2006. April started off with a bang, with a stationary front draped across the central third of the state on the 1st. Along the front, thunderstorms produced hail to the size of tennis balls at Clarksville (Johnson County) and ping pong ball size hail at Caddo Valley (Clark County). Flooding was also reported along U.S. Highway 70 near Pearcy (Garland County).
In the picture: The WSR-88D (Doppler Weather Radar) showed scattered severe storms developing across the central third of Arkansas at 515 pm CST on 04/01/2006.

 

The front moved back to the north early on the 2nd, with a new storm system and cold front arriving later on the 2nd/early on the 3rd. Energy with this new front mostly headed north of Arkansas.

 

Severe weather reports on 04/02/2006.
In the picture: Severe weather reports on 04/02/2006. The graphic is courtesy of the Storm Prediction Center. 
 
With energy guided away from Arkansas, a severe weather outbreak was expected mainly in areas north and east of the region...including the mid-Mississippi, Ohio and Tennessee Valleys. While this occurred, Arkansas was not out of the woods.

 

At 12 pm CDT on the 2nd, nothing was happening yet. There were lots of low clouds, and a layer of warm air (inversion) aloft which capped the atmosphere. Moisture was also lacking, with a tremendous amount of dry air overhead. If there were to be any storms, they would be few. The sounding (temperature and dewpoint profile with height) at Little Rock around 1 pm CDT on 04/02/2006.
In the picture: The sounding (temperature and dewpoint profile with height) at Little Rock around 1 pm CDT on 04/02/2006...with an inversion around 850 mb (5000 ft) and lots of dry air aloft. Surface temperatures were in the mid 70s with lots of low clouds (below the inversion). It would take readings in the mid to upper 80s to overcome the inversion...and allow air parcels to ascend to build storms.

 

The satellite picture showed two prominent supercells (storms with rotating updrafts) in northeast Arkansas toward evening on 04/02/2006. By 3 pm CDT, clouds had broken up with temperatures climbing. Readings warmed enough to overcome the inversion...and then the flood gates opened. Air near the ground soared quickly skyward (updrafts), with storms building in a hurry. As expected, there were only three storms of note...but they were huge!
In the picture: The satellite picture showed two prominent supercells (storms with rotating updrafts) in northeast Arkansas toward evening on 04/02/2006. Another supercell (farther south) had tracked into Mississippi. 

 

Hail up to 5 inches in diameter fell about 2 miles north of Searcy (White County) during the afternoon of 04/02/2006.
In the picture: Hail up to 5 inches in diameter fell about 2 miles north of Searcy (White County) during the afternoon of 04/02/2006. The picture is courtesy of Martha Benskin. Click to enlarge.  
Tennis ball size hail was noted around Ozark Acres (Sharp County) during the afternoon of 04/02/2006.
In the picture: Tennis ball size hail was noted around Ozark Acres (Sharp County) during the afternoon of 04/02/2006. The picture is courtesy of Steve and Wanda Owen. Click to enlarge.  
 
While the storms were building, moisture within the updrafts evaporated initially as it encountered dry air aloft. This created a cooling effect...making it easy for hail to form. The updrafts suspended hailstones aloft, which allowed the stones to grow. In the end, there were several instances where hail was larger than 4 inches in diameter!

 

More Information
 
There is more concerning the storms of April 1st-3rd. To check out the rest of the story, click here.

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