Climate Data
Yearly Reports
Interested in what kind of weather occurred in a recent year? Check out the most memorable events below.
 
Severe Weather/Heavy Rain on February 24, 2011 (Pg1)
 
A mild Pacific flow drove a system aloft toward Arkansas by evening on 02/24/2011. The snow of early February was a distant memory by the 24th, as a mild Pacific flow brought springlike temperatures to parts of Arkansas. It also drove a system toward the region from the Plains, and triggered severe thunderstorms. 
In the picture: A mild Pacific flow drove a system aloft toward Arkansas by evening on 02/24/2011. There was a tremendous amount of wind ahead of the system, with south winds at 40 to 60 knots at 5000 feet (850 millibars) and 70 to 90 knots from the southwest at 18000 feet (500 millibars). These winds created a fast storm movement, and increased the odds that thunderstorms would produce strong to damaging gusts. Winds also turned with height, with a chance of isolated tornadoes.

 

Severe weather was concentrated over central and southern sections of the state where temperatures in the 70s to around 80 degrees destabilized the atmosphere. El Dorado (Union County) reached 78 degrees, with 79 degrees at Pine Bluff (Jefferson County) and 80 degrees at Monticello (Drew County).
Severe weather reports on 02/24/2011.
In the picture: Severe weather reports on 02/24/2011. The graphic is courtesy of the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, OK.

 

A storm system was in eastern Oklahoma by the early afternoon of 02/24/2011. Farther north, it was too cool for severe weather (temperatures in the 40s/50s). However, there was plenty of heavy rain and some flash flooding.
In the picture: A storm system was in eastern Oklahoma by the early afternoon of 02/24/2011. The heaviest rain was expected north of the track from northern Arkansas to the Ohio Valley. The greatest severe weather concern was south of the track in central and southern sections of the state.

 

The dividing line between heavy rain and severe storms was a warm front, which was draped pretty close to the Interstate 40 corridor. Temperatures stayed cool north of a warm front (red line) due to clouds and rain on 02/24/2011.
In the picture: Temperatures stayed cool north of a warm front (red line) due to clouds and rain on 02/24/2011. Readings toward the Missouri border had trouble getting out of the 40s. Readings south of the front made it well into the 70s. Severe weather was most likely near the front (where the two vastly different air masses collided). 

 

The WSR-88D (Doppler Weather Radar) showed widespread rain from northern and western Arkansas into southern Missouri at 128 pm CST on 02/24/2011.
Rain tended to fill in north of the front during the early afternoon of the 24th. There was a lull farther south, with little to no precipitation. This allowed the atmosphere to heat up.
In the picture: The WSR-88D (Doppler Weather Radar) showed widespread rain from northern and western Arkansas into southern Missouri at 128 pm CST on 02/24/2011. Just to the southeast of the rain area, the atmosphere was primed for severe weather as warm and humid air flowed into the region from the Gulf Coast.

 

Once severe storms fired up, they tended to stick to the warm front (boundary) initially. They also moved very quickly (50 to 60 mph or more). Wind damage was noted from Hot Springs (Garland County) to Little Rock (Pulaski County) and Brinkley (Monroe County). The WSR-88D (Doppler Weather Radar) showed bowing segments (backward "C" shaped clusters of storms) whisking through central Arkansas at 50 to 60 mph at 400 pm CST on 02/24/2011.
In the picture: The WSR-88D (Doppler Weather Radar) showed bowing segments (backward "C" shaped clusters of storms) whisking through central Arkansas at 50 to 60 mph at 400 pm CST on 02/24/2011. Wind punching through the storms created the bow shapes. The storms exhibited rotation at times, and spawned isolated tornadoes.

 

Most damage reports consisted of trees and power lines down, and this resulted in power outages. Wind gusts were generally from 60 to 70 mph. There was an injury just east of Hot Springs (Garland County) after a tree fell into a house. Two 18 wheelers were flipped over near Brinkley (Monroe County), with an injury noted.

As the event progressed, a line of storms developed south of the warm front, and moved quickly across the southern counties. Strong to damaging winds were reported.

 

Link of Interest
Radar Loop (301 pm CST to 701 pm CST)

 

More Information
 
There is more concerning severe weather and heavy rain on February 24th. To check out the rest of the story, click here.

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