Climate Data
Yearly Reports
Interested in what kind of weather occurred in a recent year? Check out the most memorable events below.
 
Heavy Rain on October 29-30, 2009
 
Percent of normal rainfall in October, 2009 (through the 28th). It was a very wet October (through the 28th), with 200 to more than 400 percent of normal rainfall in much of Arkansas. Unfortunately, there was more precipitation on the 29th/30th...and this was a significant flood event.
In the picture: Percent of normal rainfall in October, 2009 (through the 28th).

 

A large storm system in the Rockies headed through the Plains into the upper Midwest on the 29th. Rain increased ahead of the system, and became widespread in Arkansas.

 

A storm system ("L") dug southward through the Rockies as powerful winds aloft remained to the west of the system on 10/28/2009.
In the picture: A storm system ("L") dug southward through the Rockies as powerful winds aloft remained to the west of the system on 10/28/2009.
As these winds went around and east of the system, the digging stopped and the system ejected into the Plains on 10/29/2009.
In the picture: As these winds went around and east of the system, the digging stopped and the system ejected into the Plains on 10/29/2009.
 
Meanwhile, a cold front arrived from the west. Because the system was so far to the north, it did not give the front much push. The front slowed down, which prolonged the rain.

 

There was a tremendous amount of moisture in place, and heavy precipitation focused around the front.
Precipitable water values increased markedly through 700 am CDT on 10/30/2009.
In the picture: Precipitable water values increased markedly through 700 am CDT on 10/30/2009. Precipitable water, or water vapor contained in a vertical column of at atmosphere, is normally between .75" and 1.00" in late October.

 

 

Twenty four hour rainfall through 700 am CDT on 10/30/2009.
By the end of the 29th, rain moved through much of western Arkansas...with rainfall amounts from one to three inches. Precipitation built slowly from central into eastern sections of the state, and that is where it remained through the morning of the 30th.
In the picture: Twenty four hour rainfall through 700 am CDT on 10/30/2009.

 

Three to five inch amounts were common in the central/eastern counties, and there was locally more than six inches. Twenty four hour amounts through 700 am CDT on the 30th included 7.16 inches at Sheridan (Grant County), 7.12 inches at Leola (Grant County) and 6.00 inches at Coal Hill (Johnson County).

 

Twenty Four Hour Rainfall (through 700 am CDT on 10/30/2009)
Site Amount (Inches)
Sheridan (Grant Co) 7.16
Leola (Grant Co) 7.12
Coal Hill (Johnson Co) 6.00
Camden (Ouachita Co) 5.47
Booneville (Logan Co) 5.19
Little Rock (Pulaski Co) 5.08
Searcy (White Co) 4.89
El Dorado(Union Co) 4.70
Warren (Bradley Co) 4.70
Star City (Lincoln Co) 4.56
Batesville L/D (Independence Co) 4.53
Mammoth Spring (Fulton Co) 4.33
Cabot (Lonoke Co) 4.22
Madison (St. Francis Co) 4.19
Calamine (Sharp Co) 4.17
Greers Ferry Dam (Cleburne Co) 4.12
Moro Bay State Park (Bradley Co) 4.10
Fordyce (Dallas Co) 4.06

 

The heaviest band of rain was noted from Camden (Ouachita County) to Little Rock (Pulaski County) and Batesville (Independence County). There were numerous roads under water and water rescues occurred. Water flowed into some homes and apartments. A couple of subdivisions in Cabot (Lonoke County) had to be evacuated.

There was one flash flood fatality. About 2 miles north of Bethesda (Independence County), high water swept a man from his pickup truck.

Flash flooding was also widespread from Mena (Polk County) to Clarksville (Johnson County). In Newton County, there was at least one mudslide...with rocks and other debris on area highways.  

 

Tributaries were high before the rain came...especially portions of the Black, Cache, Ouachita and White Rivers. Even so, water levels were below flood stage at most forecast points. Flooding became more widespread and serious following the event.
Rivers were above flood stage or expected to exceed flood stage at numerous sites in central and eastern Arkansas on 10/30/2009.
In the picture: Rivers were above flood stage or expected to exceed flood stage at numerous sites in central and eastern Arkansas on 10/30/2009.

 

At Hardy (Sharp County) and Imboden (Lawrence County), there was major flooding along the Spring River...with top 10 crests on record. During the evening of the 30th, the Little Red River crested at the 6th highest level in recorded history at Judsonia (White County).

 

Spring River at Hardy (Sharp County)/Flood Stage 10 Feet
Time Stage (Feet)
10 pm (10/29) 6.83
12 am (10/30) 7.90
2 am (10/30) 11.15
4 am (10/30) 14.38
6 am (10/30) 16.51
8 am (10/30) 17.33
10 am (10/30) 16.94
Note: The river crested at 17.41 feet at 815 am on 10/30, the 4th highest stage on record.

 

 

Storm Reports
 Preliminary reports of flash flooding and severe weather in the Little Rock County Warning Area on October 29-30, 2009 (in red).
Submit a storm report.
There were numerous reports of flash flooding on October 29-30, 2009. To check out the reports, click here.
In the picture: Preliminary reports of flash flooding in the Little Rock County Warning Area on October 29-30, 2009 (in red).

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