Climate Data
Yearly Reports
Interested in what kind of weather occurred in a recent year? Check out the most memorable events below.
 
Severe Weather/Heavy Rain on September 7-11, 2010
 
Tropical Storm Hermine ("L") made landfall in northern Mexico late on 09/06/2010 before weakening and tracking into south Texas. The tropics became active heading into early September. Tropical Storm Hermine made landfall in northern Mexico late on September 6th, and headed into south Texas. Meanwhile, a cold front approached Arkansas from the Plains and stalled.
In the picture: Tropical Storm Hermine ("L") made landfall in northern Mexico late on 09/06/2010 before weakening and tracking into south Texas. The system headed northward through Oklahoma, southeast Kansas and Missouri, and interacted with a stalled front in northern Arkansas to bring areas of heavy to excessive rain.

 

Moisture pooled around the front, and resulted in heavy rain in northern and western sections sections of the state.

 

From the 7th through the 9th, one to three inch rainfall totals were common north and west of Little Rock (Pulaski County). There was locally more than five inches. Seventy two hour (three day) precipitation through 700 am CDT on 09/10/2010.
In the picture: Seventy two hour (three day) precipitation through 700 am CDT on 09/10/2010.

 

Seventy two hour (three day) precipitation through 700 am CDT on 09/10/2010. The heaviest rain was north of Fort Smith (Sebastian County) and Jonesboro (Craighead County).
In the picture: Seventy two hour (three day) precipitation through 700 am CDT on 09/10/2010. Point "A" is Devils Knob (Johnson County), "B" is Natural Dam (Crawford County), "C" is Clarksville (Johnson County), "D" is Compton (Newton County), "E" is St. Paul (Madison County), "F" is Blanchard Springs (Stone County), "G" is Strickler (Washington County), "H" is Deer (Newton County), "I" is Mountain View (Stone County) and "J" is Evening Shade (Sharp County).

 

Seventy two hour (three day) rainfall through 700 am CDT on the 10th included 12.02 inches at Devils Knob (Johnson County), 9.00 inches at Natural Dam (Crawford County), 7.76 inches at Clarksville (Johnson County), 7.35 inches at Compton (Newton County), 6.92 inches at St. Paul (Madison County) and 6.58 inches at Harrison (Boone County).

 

Seventy Two Hour Rainfall (through 700 am CDT on 09/10/2010)
Site Amount (Inches)
Devils Knob (Johnson Co) 12.02
Natural Dam (Crawford Co) 9.00
Clarksville (Johnson Co) 7.76
Compton (Newton Co) 7.35
St. Paul (Madison Co) 6.92
Harrison (Boone Co) 6.58
Lead Hill (Boone Co) 5.91
Blanchard Springs (Stone Co) 5.86
Strickler (Washington Co) 5.81
Deer (Newton Co) 5.18
Mountain View (Stone Co) 5.11
Evening Shade (Sharp Co) 4.80

 

At Harrison (Boone County), the monthly total was pushed to 9.60 inches. By the end of the month, the total reached 11.43 inches...the second wettest September on record. In August, there was only 0.34 inch locally. 

 

 

Localized flash flooding resulted. On the 7th, roads were covered by water at Horsehead Lake (Johnson County). At one time, the area was inaccessible by law enforcement. There were a couple of campers in the area, but they were in a safe place (higher ground). A few miles north of Hartman (Johnson County), Horsehead Creek went out of its banks on the 9th and flooded a home. Water was also over Highway 14 in Mountain View (Stone County).

 

In addition to heavy rain, there was a potential for severe weather. It is not uncommon for isolated tornadoes to accompany tropical systems, and that was the case with Hermine.
Numerous Flood and Flash Flood Watches/Warnings were posted surrounding the remnants of Tropical Storm Hermine during the evening of 09/08/2010.
In the picture: Numerous Flood and Flash Flood Watches/Warnings were posted surrounding the remnants of Tropical Storm Hermine during the evening of 09/08/2010. A Tornado Watch and a few Tornado Warnings were also in effect in portions of northeast Texas, southeast Oklahoma and southwest Arkansas.

 

On the 7th, a brief tornado (rated EF0) was spawned a few miles east-southeast of Hope (Hempstead County) in southwest Arkansas. The tornado caused some tree damage.

 

Probabilities (in %) of helicity (representing the potential for rotating winds) reaching at least 150 m2/s2 from 700 pm CDT on 09/08/2010 to 100 pm CDT on 09/09/2010.
More isolated storms popped up during the afternoon of the 8th in the southwest. Tornado Warnings were issued for Hempstead, Nevada and Clark Counties.
In the picture: Probabilities (in %) of helicity (representing the potential for rotating winds) reaching at least 150 m2/s2 from 700 pm CDT on 09/08/2010 to 100 pm CDT on 09/09/2010. The highest values were just to the right (east) of the track of Hermine. The graphics in the loop are courtesy of the Storm Prediction Center.

 

Funnel clouds were witnessed, but no tornadoes were confirmed. Forty eight hour precipitation through 700 am CDT on 09/09/2010.
In the picture: A wall cloud was observed near Hollywood (Clark County) during the evening of 09/08/2010. The photo is courtesy of Mikki Hastings, Clark County Deputy Emergency Coordinator. Click to enlarge.

 

A few more Tornado Warnings were issued in northeast sections of the state on the 9th as the remnants of Hermine tracked into southern Missouri. Again, it appears no tornadoes were spawned.

 

Dewpoints in the 70s (humid) were replaced by readings in the 40s/50s (dry) behind a cold front on 09/12/2010.
The system exited toward the Ohio Valley on the 10th, and the front lifted to the north. Tropical moisture remained in place until a new cold front swept through Arkansas from the northwest on the 11th.
In the picture: Dewpoints in the 70s (humid) were replaced by readings in the 40s/50s (dry) behind a cold front on 09/12/2010.

 

Hit and miss showers and thunderstorms brought one to two inches of rain to a few areas in the southeast half of the state. West of Acorn (Polk County), local amounts up to three inches caused minor flooding along Highway 270.

Moisture was eventually shunted toward the Gulf Coast, and was replaced by much drier and more comfortable air.

 

Storm Reports
There were isolated reports of flash flooding in northern and western Arkansas on September 7-11, 2010. For a look at some reports, click here.
Preliminary reports of severe weather in the Little Rock County Warning Area on September 7-11, 2010 (in red).
Submit a storm report.
In the picture: Preliminary reports of severe weather in the Little Rock County Warning Area on September 7-11, 2010 (in red).

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