Climate Data
Yearly Reports
Interested in what kind of weather occurred in a recent year? Check out the most memorable events below.
 
Heavy Rain on March 17-19, 2008 (Pictures)
 
Map of the Black and lower White Rivers. An aerial survey was conducted along the Black and lower White Rivers on March 27, 2008. Water was spread out for miles as noted in the pictures below.
 
 
Water on still on the rise along the lower White River at Clarendon (Monroe County.
In the picture: Water on still on the rise along the lower White River at Clarendon (Monroe County. Click to enlarge.
Farther upstream at Des Arc (Prairie County), the river was slowly declining...but plenty of water remained.
In the picture: Farther upstream at Des Arc (Prairie County), the river was slowly declining...but plenty of water remained. Click to enlarge.
 
Georgetown (White County) was cutoff by high water, with some flooding in town.
In the picture: Georgetown (White County) was cutoff by high water, with some flooding in town. Click to enlarge.
Extensive flooding was also noted at Augusta (Woodruff County).
In the picture: Extensive flooding was also noted at Augusta (Woodruff County). Click to enlarge.
 
A closer look at Augusta (Woodruff County), with houses under water at Taylor Bay.
In the picture: A closer look at Augusta (Woodruff County), with houses under water at Taylor Bay. Click to enlarge.
While the lower White River was falling at Newport (Jackson County), water from the Black River was still coming.
In the picture: While the lower White River was falling at Newport (Jackson County), water from the Black River was still coming. Click to enlarge.
 
North of Newport (Jackson County), the winding Black River flooded surrounding farmland.
In the picture: North of Newport (Jackson County), the winding Black River flooded surrounding farmland. Click to enlarge.
The Black River was receding at Pocahontas (Randolph County), but it was hard to tell.
In the picture: The Black River was receding at Pocahontas (Randolph County), but it was hard to tell. Click to enlarge.
 
U.S. Highway 67 cut through water between Pocahontas (Randolph County) and Corning (Clay County).
In the picture: U.S. Highway 67 cut through water between Pocahontas (Randolph County) and Corning (Clay County). Click to enlarge.
Signs of flooding decreased markedly around Corning (Clay County), but there was still high water along the Black River about two miles east of town.
In the picture: Signs of flooding decreased markedly around Corning (Clay County), but there was still high water along the Black River about two miles east of town. Click to enlarge.

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