Monthly Storm Reports and Storm Data
Storm Reports
Are you interested in what happened during a recent event? Check out the report below.
 
Cold and Dry in Late January, 2014 (21st through the 29th)
 

It was cold and dry in late January, with at least three surges of arctic air. There was little to no precipitation with any of the surges. The last time significant precipitation occurred was on the 10th.

 

Arctic blasts in early December, 2013 and early January, 2014 were shown by downward trends in the Arctic Oscillation (AO) Index.
In the picture: Arctic blasts in early December, 2013 and early January, 2014 were shown by downward trends in the Arctic Oscillation (AO) Index. Without getting too technical, this index can be a decent predictor of temperature trends in winter. If the index goes negative (positive), it generally cools off (warms up).
 

Breaking it down, Canada visited on January 21st. Afternoon temperatures failed to reach freezing toward the Missouri border. At 300 pm CST, readings ranged from 26 degrees at Harrison (Boone County) and Mountain Home (Baxter County) to 44 degrees at El Dorado (Union County) and Texarkana (Miller County).

 

Temperatures at 300 pm CST on 01/21/2014. Earlier in the day, there were a few snow flurries in the far north. Gusty north to northwest winds produced wind chill index values near zero in the northwest counties.
In the picture: Temperatures at 300 pm CST on 01/21/2014.

 

It was even colder on the 23rd. Thermometers showed 20s/30s statewide during the daytime, with some teens in the far north. Like the 21st, there was no appreciable snow (other than flurries) or ice and a lot of wind. Morning wind chill indices were between zero and ten below zero in the northwest. 

In the pictures: Temperatures were at/below freezing in much of Arkansas, with clearing from the north during the afternoon of 01/23/2014. There were plenty of clouds along the Gulf Coast, and some reports of light rain and light snow in eastern Texas and western Louisiana. This was ahead of arctic high pressure ("H") in the Plains.

 

There was another visit from the north on the 27th. This kept temperatures subpar through the 29th, and guaranteed a dry end to the month. These big cold air masses made it way too dry for much to fall from the sky. A low wildfire danger reached moderate/high status, and county burn bans increased at an alarming rate (up to 55 of 75 counties).

 

A northwest wind flow aloft existed between a ridge of high pressure ("H") over the southwest United States and a trough of low pressure ("L") to the northeast at 600 pm CST on 01/18/2014.
In the picture: A northwest wind flow aloft existed between a ridge of high pressure ("H") over the southwest United States and a trough of low pressure ("L") to the northeast at 600 pm CST on 01/18/2014.
 

Arkansas was sandwiched between a ridge of high pressure to the west and a trough of low pressure to the east. Between these features, the flow from Canada drove cold fronts and surges of arctic air southward.

 

One arctic air mass arrived in Arkansas on 01/21/2014, with another arctic surge by 01/23/2014.
01/21/14   |  01/22/14   |   01/23/14   |   01/24/14
Between these surges, there were short-lived warmups. For example, it felt like spring on January 20th. Those with outdoor plans were treated to highs in the 60s to around 70 degrees. Similar conditions were experienced on the 26th, with 73 degrees at Fort Smith (Sebastian County), and 70 degrees at Mountain Home (Baxter County) and Russellville (Pope County). Batesville (Independence County) had a record high of 66 degrees.
In the pictures: One arctic air mass arrived in Arkansas on 01/21/2014, with another arctic surge by 01/23/2014. This data was generated on 01/19/2014.
 

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