Climate Data
Yearly Reports
Interested in what kind of weather occurred in a recent year? Check out the most memorable events below.
 
The Impacts of Katrina
 
A satellite picture showing the eye of Hurricane Katrina in southeast Louisiana around 8 am CDT on 08/29/2005. Hurricane Katrina made landfall in southeast Louisiana around 610 am CDT on August 29th near Grand Isle (southeast of New Orleans). Katrina was a Category 3 storm with winds around 130 mph. Katrina tracked north through Mississippi and western Tennessee...and was headed into the Ohio Valley on the 30th. The system mostly remained east of Arkansas along its journey.
In the picture: A satellite picture showing the eye of Hurricane Katrina in southeast Louisiana around 8 am CDT on 08/29/2005. Click for larger image of Katrina on 08/28/2005 before landfall

 

Over 8 inches of rain fell east of the state...or along and just east of the track of Katrina. In Arkansas, 1 to 2 inches of rain occurred in areas along the Mississippi River...with locally heavier amounts. Twenty four hour rainfall amounts as of 7 am CDT on the 30th included 1.97 inches at Jonesboro (Craighead County), 1.74 inches at West Memphis (Crittenden County) and 1.16 inches at Blytheville (Mississippi County). A 24 hour precipitation forecast through 7 am CDT on 08/30/2005.
In the picture: A 24 hour precipitation forecast through 7 am CDT on 08/30/2005.

 

A NOAA aerial image over Biloxi, MS (10 miles east of Gulfport, MS) following Hurricane Katrina on 08/30/2005.
In the picture: A NOAA aerial image over Biloxi, MS (10 miles east of Gulfport, MS) following Hurricane Katrina on 08/30/2005. Click to enlarge.
A NOAA aerial image over New Orleans, LA following Hurricane Katrina on 08/31/2005.
In the picture: A NOAA aerial image over New Orleans, LAfollowing Hurricane Katrina on 08/31/2005. Click to enlarge.
 
Severe weather was confined to areas east of Katrina in spiraling rain bands. Numerous Tornado Warnings were issued in Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia. There was no severe weather in Arkansas.

 

The eyewall of Hurricane Katrina as seen from a NOAA P-3 hurricane hunter aircraft on 08/28/2005 (before the system made landfall). Counter clockwise circulation around Katrina caused breezy conditions in about the eastern half of the state during the afternoon and evening hours of the 29th. North to northeast winds at 15 to 25 mph with higher gusts were common.
In the picture: The eyewall of Hurricane Katrina as seen from a NOAA P-3 hurricane hunter aircraft on 08/28/2005 (before the system made landfall). Click to enlarge.

 

While Arkansas was left relatively unscathed by Hurricane Katrina, it was much worse along the Gulf Coast from near New Orleans, LA to around Mobile, AL. Damaging winds, storm surge (Gulf water coming inland) and flooding have completely destroyed homes and businesses...with many people left homeless.

 

Links of Interest

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