Climate Data
Yearly Reports
Interested in what kind of weather occurred in a recent year? Check out the most memorable events below.
 
Isaac in Arkansas (August 30 - September 1, 2012)/Pg2
 
Where isolated tornadoes were most likely through 08/31/2012. On the 31st, banding was close to home, and the concern for tornadoes increased. However, widespread rain kept the atmosphere relatively stable, and this reduced the tornado threat. Conditions became more unstable in the afternoon as rain ended and the sun popped out. By that time, Isaac was exiting to the north, and tornadoes became most likely in the mid-Mississippi Valley.
In the picture: Where isolated tornadoes were most likely through 08/31/2012.

 

As September began (the 1st), the remnants of Isaac moved into eastern Missouri. Tropical moisture was still in place, and temperatures climbed into the upper 80s to upper 90s. De Queen (Sevier County) made it to 100 degrees. The remnants of Hurricane Isaac ("L") were in eastern Missouri at 400 pm CDT on 09/01/2012.
In the picture: The remnants of Hurricane Isaac ("L") were in eastern Missouri at 400 pm CDT on 09/01/2012. South of the system, it was very warm and humid (dewpoints in the 70s in central/eastern Arkansas), with breezy west to southwest winds. Models showed thunderstorms developing from northeast into central sections of the state. Winds are shown with white arrows. Dewpoints are dashed blue lines.

 

The satellite showed clouds building from northeast through central Arkansas at 415 pm CDT on 09/01/2012. It appeared Isaac would have once last hurrah before heading toward the Ohio Valley. Models indicated there would be one more round of thunderstorms before the departure of the system. There was plenty of fuel (heat/humidity) to make this happen. The models were right.
In the picture: The satellite showed clouds building from northeast through central Arkansas at 415 pm CDT on 09/01/2012.

 

Storms fired up quickly from northeast into central Arkansas, and became severe. There were quite a few microbursts and straight-line wind damage.

Mammatus clouds were in the sky above the North Little Rock Airport (Pulaski County) toward sunset on 09/01/2012.
In the picture: Mammatus clouds were in the sky above the North Little Rock Airport (Pulaski County) toward sunset on 09/01/2012. These clouds form in sinking air, most often on the underside of a cumulonimbus (thunderstorm) cloud on turbulent days. Click to enlarge.

 

Trees and/or power lines were downed in and around Des Arc (Prairie County), Dixie (Woodruff County), Beebe and Judsonia (both in White County), Benton and Bryant (both in Saline County), Conway and Vilonia (both in Faulkner County) and near Morrilton (Conway County). A hotel in Hot Springs (Garland County) that was damaged by a microburst on August 5th was hit again.

In the far northeast closer to Isaac, a tornado (rated EF2) affected the Corning (Clay County) area. At a local airport, several hangars were damaged. Two hangars were struck particularly hard, and numerous aircraft inside the hangars were thrown. Damage may exceed $5 million. A few miles to the northeast, another weak tornado (rated EF0) touched down briefly in a field. These were the first tornadoes in the state since June 4th, and only the 12th and 13th tornadoes of the year.

 

Twenty four hour rainfall through 700 am CDT on 09/02/2012.
In the picture: Twenty four hour rainfall through 700 am CDT on 09/02/2012.
 

Rain became excessive in a few spots. Malvern (Hot Spring County) got 3.30 inches of rain, with several roads under water in town. Not far away, there was street flooding at Poyen (Grant County). At Des Arc (Prairie County), 2.27 inches was measured.

 

Storm Reports
Preliminary reports of thunderstorm straight-line wind damage, non-thunderstorm wind damage, lightning, heavy rain, flash flooding and funnel clouds in the Little Rock County Warning Area on August 30-September 1, 2012 (in red).
Submit a storm report.
There were numerous reports of non-thunderstorm wind damage, heavy rain and flash flooding associated with the remnants of Hurricane Isaac on August 30th and 31st, 2012. On September 1st, severe storms produced microbursts (straight-line wind damage) and excessive rain from northeast into central Arkansas. There was a funnel cloud report as well. For a look at some reports, click here.
 
Link of Interest
Plot Reports
In the picture: Preliminary reports of thunderstorm straight-line wind damage, non-thunderstorm wind damage, lightning, heavy rain, flash flooding and funnel clouds in the Little Rock County Warning Area on August 30-September 1, 2012 (in red).

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