NOAA Weather Radio

Console Replacement System

Frequently Asked Questions & Answers



What is the NOAA Weather Radio Console Replacement System?

The Console Replacement System (CRS) is a new, personal computer-based broadcasting console, installed at each NWS office, that automatically translates and schedules written National Weather Service forecasts and warnings into synthesized-voice broadcasts over NOAA Weather Radio.

The automated broadcast programs for NOAA Weather Radio will free NWS staff to spend more time on critical warning and forecasting duties. In addition, the automatic weather broadcast consoles will provide a more efficient means of disseminating severe weather watches, warnings and emergency information over NOAA weather radio.

The state-of-the-art system is part of a multi-year improvement of the National Weather Service's NOAA Weather Radio network. NOAA Weather Radio and the CRS are critical to the NWS mission of disseminating watches and warnings of hazardous weather for the protection of life and property.

What are the benefits of automated broadcasts?

This new automated system provides faster broadcasts of severe weather watches, warnings and emergency information over NOAA Weather Radio because multiple warnings can be both recorded and transmitted at once. This capability dramatically speeds up the broadcast of warnings during multiple severe weather events.

The automated technology will also significantly reduce the time it takes National Weather Service staff to record NOAA Weather Radio broadcasts allowing them to devote more time to critical warning services and forecast duties.

Automating the process will make it easier for listeners to tune to NOAA Weather Radio at particular times for the information they need. Forecast offices will be able to broadcast particular forecasts and information such as marine and river forecasts or climate summaries in time slots on a more regular schedule (for example, at :06, :16, :26, :36, :46, and :56 after each hour).

Will all the information I currently hear on NOAA Weather Radio be broadcasts in a synthesized voice?

The synthesized voice will be phased in over time. Eventually, all forecasts, warnings and weather information will be broadcast with the synthesized voice. An NWR program can be interrupted with live broadcasts as needed.

What can you tell me about the synthesized voices used for the broadcasts?

The Console Replacement System uses state-of-the-art voice synthesis provided by the contractor DEC. The NWS is committed to making improvements to the system's voice quality as improvements become available.

When will the Console Replacement System by installed?

The National Weather Service began a one-year process of installing CRS at offices across the country in January 1998. Locally across southern California, we expect to implement CRS in late March or early April 1998.

How were broadcasts recorded prior to the automated system?

Since each transmitter operated by the NWS office also has a unique geographical coverage area, in the past, NWS staff members manually recorded the forecasts and current weather information for each listening area. This was done using technology that limited programming variability and locked the messages into a repetitive sequential order. Producing and updating information in this manner was time consuming since most Weather Service forecast offices operate multiple (up to 13) different NOAA Weather Radio transmitters.

Do I need to purchase a new receiver to receive the new automated broadcasts?

No, you will not need to make any changes to the receiver you have in your home or business to receive the automated broadcasts.

How does the Console Replacement System work with the new Specific Area Message Encoding service?

CRS and the Specific Area Message Encoding (SAME) are two separate NOAA Weather Radio technological advances as part of the National Weather Service modernization effort. Specific Area Message Encoding (SAME) is a feature on the newest generation of NOAA Weather Radios which lets listeners pre-select the National Weather Service alerts they want to receive based on the county where they live. CRS automates the process of assigning SAME codes to watches and warnings.

 

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NOAA Weather Radio

 

Console Replacement System

 

Frequently Asked Questions & Answers



What is the NOAA Weather Radio Console Replacement System?

The Console Replacement System (CRS) is a new, personal computer-based broadcasting console, installed at each NWS office, that automatically translates and schedules written National Weather Service forecasts and warnings into synthesized-voice broadcasts over NOAA Weather Radio.

The automated broadcast programs for NOAA Weather Radio will free NWS staff to spend more time on critical warning and forecasting duties. In addition, the automatic weather broadcast consoles will provide a more efficient means of disseminating severe weather watches, warnings and emergency information over NOAA weather radio.

The state-of-the-art system is part of a multi-year improvement of the National Weather Service's NOAA Weather Radio network. NOAA Weather Radio and the CRS are critical to the NWS mission of disseminating watches and warnings of hazardous weather for the protection of life and property.

What are the benefits of automated broadcasts?

This new automated system provides faster broadcasts of severe weather watches, warnings and emergency information over NOAA Weather Radio because multiple warnings can be both recorded and transmitted at once. This capability dramatically speeds up the broadcast of warnings during multiple severe weather events.

The automated technology will also significantly reduce the time it takes National Weather Service staff to record NOAA Weather Radio broadcasts allowing them to devote more time to critical warning services and forecast duties.

Automating the process will make it easier for listeners to tune to NOAA Weather Radio at particular times for the information they need. Forecast offices will be able to broadcast particular forecasts and information such as marine and river forecasts or climate summaries in time slots on a more regular schedule (for example, at :06, :16, :26, :36, :46, and :56 after each hour).

Will all the information I currently hear on NOAA Weather Radio be broadcasts in a synthesized voice?

The synthesized voice will be phased in over time. Eventually, all forecasts, warnings and weather information will be broadcast with the synthesized voice. An NWR program can be interrupted with live broadcasts as needed.

What can you tell me about the synthesized voices used for the broadcasts?

The Console Replacement System uses state-of-the-art voice synthesis provided by the contractor DEC. The NWS is committed to making improvements to the system's voice quality as improvements become available.

When will the Console Replacement System by installed?

The National Weather Service began a one-year process of installing CRS at offices across the country in January 1998. Locally across southern California, we expect to implement CRS in late March or early April 1998.

How were broadcasts recorded prior to the automated system?

Since each transmitter operated by the NWS office also has a unique geographical coverage area, in the past, NWS staff members manually recorded the forecasts and current weather information for each listening area. This was done using technology that limited programming variability and locked the messages into a repetitive sequential order. Producing and updating information in this manner was time consuming since most Weather Service forecast offices operate multiple (up to 13) different NOAA Weather Radio transmitters.

Do I need to purchase a new receiver to receive the new automated broadcasts?

No, you will not need to make any changes to the receiver you have in your home or business to receive the automated broadcasts.

How does the Console Replacement System work with the new Specific Area Message Encoding service?

CRS and the Specific Area Message Encoding (SAME) are two separate NOAA Weather Radio technological advances as part of the National Weather Service modernization effort. Specific Area Message Encoding (SAME) is a feature on the newest generation of NOAA Weather Radios which lets listeners pre-select the National Weather Service alerts they want to receive based on the county where they live. CRS automates the process of assigning SAME codes to watches and warnings.

 

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