StormReady Logo

Muleshoe and Bailey County become "StormReady”

Muleshoe, TX, May 11, 2009, from left:  Mayor Cliff Black, Eric McElroy, Gary Parker, EMC -Brian Frieda, NWS Lubbock, TX, WCM Jody James, Mayor Pro Temp Irene Mason, Benny Parker, Richard Orosco.

Muleshoe, TX, May 11, 2009, from left:  Mayor Cliff Black, Eric McElroy, Gary Parker, EMC -Brian Frieda, NWS Lubbock, TX, WCM Jody James, Mayor Pro Temp Irene Mason, Benny Parker, Richard Orosco.


Muleshoe, Texas and Bailey County have been recognized as StormReady according to the National Weather Service Office in Lubbock, Texas. Muleshoe completed the application and inspection process earlier this year, and was designated a StormReady community on May 1, 2009. Bailey County has also been recognized as a StormReady county. Both entities were officially recognized on May 1, 2009. The official certificates and StormReady signs were presented to Mayor Cliff Black, Emergency Management Coordinator Brian Frieda, and to members of the City Council on May 11, 2009 at the Muleshoe City Hall. Muleshoe becomes the 7th community across the NWS Lubbock forecast area to receive the StormReady recognition. Bailey County becomes the 4th county in the same area to be recognized.

NWS Lubbock Warning Coordination Meteorologist Jody James and Muleshoe Police Chief and Emergency Management Coordinator Brian Frieda hold the StormReady sign which will be displayed in Muleshoe. The city of Muleshoe and Bailey County were recognized as “StormReady” on May  1, 2009.
NWS Lubbock Warning Coordination Meteorologist Jody James and Muleshoe Police Chief and Emergency Management Coordinator Brian Frieda hold the StormReady sign which will be displayed in Muleshoe. The city of Muleshoe and Bailey County were recognized as “StormReady” on May  1, 2009.
 

 What is StormReady?

 
The StormReady program recognizes communities that have in place multiple ways to monitor local weather conditions and receive hazardous weather information from the National Weather Service. A community must also have multiple ways to disseminate warning information to local residents, and must have visited their local National Weather Service Office, and organized local severe weather safety talks.  
 
Americans live in the most severe weather-prone country on Earth. Each year, a startling 10,000 thunderstorms, 2,500 floods, 1,000 tornadoes, and an average of ten hurricanes impact the United States. Potentially deadly severe weather impacts every American. Communities can now rely on the National Weather Service’s StormReady program to help them guard against the ravages of Mother Nature. Ninety percent of all presidentially declared disasters are weather related.Through the StormReady program, NOAA’s National Weather Service gives communities the skills and education needed to survive severe weather – before and during the event. StormReady helps community leaders and emergency managers strengthen their local hazardous weather operations. StormReady communities are better prepared to save lives from the onslaught of severe weather through better planning, education, and awareness. Communities have fewer fatalities and property damage if they plan.
 
For more information, see the following link to the NWS StormReady website – www.stormready.noaa.gov
 
For more information about the local NWS Lubbock StormReady program -

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