Lubbock Severe Weather Conference Title Image

Lubbock 2010 Severe Weather Conference Summary

The National Weather Service (NWS) Forecast Office in Lubbock and Texas Tech University (TTU) sponsored a Severe Weather Conference on February 17-19, 2010 at the Overton Hotel and Conference Center in Lubbock, Texas.  The purpose of the conference was to provide an opportunity for research and operational meteorologists to discuss issues and present research on a broad spectrum of severe weather topics.  

The conference was attended by 115 individuals representing twelve NWS research and forecast offices, three universities (TTU, Texas A&M, University of Oklahoma) and six media outlets (from Lubbock, Amarillo and Midland).  There were 26 presentations during the conference on topics such as the 1970 Lubbock tornado, Greensburg, KS tornado, tropical cyclone tornadoes, lightning observations and mapping, phased array radar, hurricane wind and wave damage assessment, VORTEX 2 research project and many other topics concerning instrumentation and wind engineering. 


The keynote addresses were all by well-respected experts in their field, such as Dr. Kishor Mehta, Dr. Charles Doswell, Roger Edwards, Tim Marshall, Dr. Pam Heinselman, Dr. Chris Weiss, and Don Burgess.  Several TTU graduate students also presented their research.  The conference concluded with an optional tour of TTU West Texas Mesonet and Wind Science and Engineering Laboratory facilities at Reese Center.  The conference was provided free to all attendees and was funded by the Cooperative Program for Operational Meteorology, Education and Training, NWS (Lubbock and Southern Region Headquarters, Fort Worth),  and the Texas Tech University Student Chapter of the American Meteorological Society.

If you would like more details on the conference that took place, please visit the web site that was created for the conference HERE.  Also, you can find a story that was put together on the conference by KWES-TV Meteorologist Jessica Ryan HERE.

Below are a small sample of some photographs taken during the conference. 

Dr. Kishor Mehta gives a presentation of the 1970 Lubbock tornado

Keynote speaker Dr. Kishor Mehta (lower right) opens up the presentations with a talk on the 40th anniversary of the 1970 Lubbock tornado. (click on image for large version)

 
Dr. Chuck Doswell gives a presentation at the conference

Loren Phillips of Texas Tech University introduces Dr. Chuck Doswell of OU/CIMMS for another keynote talk titled, "The Importance of Data Analysis in the Forecast Process". (click on image for large version)

 
Matt Laubhan of KLBK-TV Lubbock interviews National Weather Service Lubbock meteorologist-in-charge Justin Weaver

Local and regional media were on-hand to participate in and report on the conference. In this picture, Matt Laubhan, chief meteorologist at KLBK-TV in Lubbock interviews Justin Weaver, Meteorologist-In-Charge of the National Weather Service office in Lubbock.

 
Moderator Jody James gives a couple gifts to keynote speaker Tim Marshall.

Moderator Jody James (NWS) gives a couple Lubbock-oriented gifts to keynote speaker Tim Marshall after his talk on building damage issues in hurricanes.

 
Texas Tech University graduate student Ian Giammanco and Dr. Chuck Doswell engage in spirited scientific debate.

Texas Tech University graduate student Ian Giammanco and Dr. Chuck Doswell of OU/CIMMS engage in spirited scientific debate after Ian's talk titled, "WSR-88D Observations of Tropical Cyclone Low-Level Wind Maxima". (click on image for large version)

 
Conference attendees mingle and snack during a break.

Conference attendees mingle and snack during a break. (click on image for large version)

 
Picture of a "Stick-Net" probe that was setup in the conference lobby. A "Stick-Net" is a versatile, rapid-deployable, 2.5 m meteorological observing station developed by students and faculty at Texas Tech University. The platform collects high-resolution meteorological data, and is designed to be deployed in large numbers, in a short period of time, by a small number of people, in many different weather conditions including thunderstorms and hurricanes. (click on image for large version)

Picture of a "Stick-Net" probe that was setup in the conference lobby. A "Stick-Net" is a versatile, rapid-deployable, 2.5 m meteorological observing station developed by students and faculty at Texas Tech University. The platform collects high-resolution meteorological data, and is designed to be deployed in large numbers, in a short period of time, by a small number of people, in many different weather conditions including thunderstorms and hurricanes. (click on image for large version)

 
Dr. Christopher Weiss of Texas Tech University gives a keynote presentation titled, "The VORTEX2 Project: Goals and Preliminary Results".

Dr. Christopher Weiss of Texas Tech University gives a keynote presentation titled, "The VORTEX2 Project: Goals and Preliminary Results". (click on image for large version)

A meeting of the SOOs. National Weather Service Science and Operations Officers from Midland (left - Brian Curran), Amarillo (center - Rich Wynne), and Lubbock (right- Steve Cobb) discuss things.

National Weather Service Science and Operations Officers from Midland (left - Brian Curran), Amarillo (center - Rich Wynne), and Lubbock (right- Steve Cobb) discuss things. (click on image for large version)

Roger Edwards of the Storm Prediction Center delivers a keynote talk titled, "Tropical Cyclone Tornadoes".

Roger Edwards of the Storm Prediction Center delivers a keynote talk titled, "Tropical Cyclone Tornadoes".  (click on image for large version)

Dr. Pamela Heinselman of the National Severe Storms Laboratory gives a keynote prosentation titled, "Exploiting NWRT PAR Capabilities to Improve Temporal Data Resolution".

Dr. Pamela Heinselman of the National Severe Storms Laboratory gives a keynote prosentation titled, "Exploiting NWRT PAR Capabilities to Improve Temporal Data Resolution". (click on image for large version)

Picture of a tornado simulator recently constructed at the Texas Tech Wind Science and Engineering Laboratory at Reese Center.   In addition to visualizing a tornadic circulation, this simulator will be used to collect critical information to infer how tornado winds may affect structures.

Picture of a tornado simulator recently constructed at the Texas Tech Wind Science and Engineering Laboratory at Reese Center.   In addition to visualizing a tornadic circulation, this simulator will be used to collect critical information to infer how tornado winds may affect structures. (click on image for large version)

 


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