Huntsville Weather Timeline  Station History - Huntsville Weather Timeline

NWS Huntsville Management History - Office Awards
 2014 January:  A very cold weather pattern in place for much of the month produced the 8th coldest on record at the Huntsville International Airport (average monthly temperature was 33.8 degrees/7.7 degrees below normal ) and the12th coldest at the Muscle Shoals Regional Airport (average monthly temperature was 35.2 degrees/5.8 degrees below normal).
 2013 October 31A very windy Halloween night was experienced across the Huntsville Forecast Area with as non-convective winds gusted to between 40 and 50 mph, especially in higher elevations. Even in lower elevations wind gusts to around 40 mph were common.
  October 23Huntsville International Airport recognized as a StormReady location (only the 10th airport in the country to be StormReady).
  July 4Extremely heavy rainfall occurred between 7 am CDT on July 3rd through 7 am CDT on July 4th across northern Alabama and Southern Middle Tennessee, especially in western Madison, western Morgan, and much of Lawrence counties.  Between 4 and 8 inches of rainfall occurred during this period causing some flash flooding/flooding impacts in those counties.
  June 16-18:  A series of disturbances embedded in westerly flow interacted with an unstable and moist atmosphere to produce between 2 and 6 inches of rainfall over portions of the Tennessee Valley.
  June 9One EF-1 tornado and 1 EF-0 tornado touched down in Franklin county Tennessee. Although not unheard of, tornadoes are more uncommon in the summer months.
  June 4:  Deaf and Hard of Hearing Spotter Class held at the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Service Center in Decatur, AL.  Free emergency preparedness backpacks were given out at the event by the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services thanks to a grant by the Public Health Department.
  May 3-6:  Between May 3rd and May 6th, a slow moving cold front and mutiple upper level disturbances brought an extended period of heavy rain and cooler temperatures to much of Northern Alabama, especially in locations east of I-65.  This lead to impressive rainfall totals between 6 and 8 inches in southern Madison, central Marshall, and SW Dekalb counties for the entire period. This forced several river points along the Tennessee River to climb above flood stage.
  March 18A storm system brought severe storms producing 2 EF-2 tornadoes (affecting primarily Marshall and Dekalb counties in Alabama), 1 EF-1 tornado, 1 EF-0 tornado, damaging winds, and hail up to 1.5 inches in diameter to the Huntsville Forecast Area.
  March 12Deaf and Hard of Hearing Spotter Class held at the Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind-Shoals Regional Center in Tuscumbia, AL. 
  March 1-3:   A weak upper level system combined with low level moisture to bring a prolonged period of light snow to the Tennessee Valley Friday afternoon through Sunday morning, March 3rd.  Due to the fairly warm ground temperatures and light nature of the snowfall, much of the snow melted as it fell across the region.  However, a few locations received measurable snowfall during the period.
  January 30A storm system brought strong to severe storms to the area including 2 EF-1 tornadoes, damaging winds, and some isolated flash flooding to the Huntsville Forecast Area.
  January 17Moderate to heavy snowfall fell across central portions of north central Alabama, as a potent upper level low pressure system moved quickly through Alabama and Georgia Thursday and Thursday night. This produced heavy snowfall across Morgan, Cullman, and Marshall counties, and the southern portion of Madison county of the Huntsville Forecast area totaling up to 4 inches. Lighter amounts around a trace to a few hundredths of an inch fell across much of northwestern Alabama and portions of Southern Middle Tennessee.
  January 10Redstone Arsenal and Marshall Space Flight Center were designated as StormReady.
2012 December 5Nucor Steel (Decatur, AL) was recognized as a StormReady Supporter.
  October 1:  National Weather Service (NWS) Huntsville was part of the University of Alabama at Huntsville's (UAH's) Weather Fest.  A day of weather information and activities at the UAH campus.
  September 13Deaf and Hard of Hearing Spotter Class held at the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services Center in Huntsville, AL.  Free NOAA Weather Radios and strobe light attachments were given out by the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services thanks to a grant by the Public Health Department.  
  June 13:  AWIPS II workstations installed and operational testing and evaluation initiated at NWS Huntsville Forecast Office.
  June 1:  Northeast Alabama Community College was designated a StormReady Supporter.
  May 23:  University of North Alabama recognized as a StormReady University.
  April 27-29:  National Weather Service personnel from the Huntsville Forecast Office staffed a booth at the 3-day Panoply Arts Festival in Huntsville Alabama. Staff disseminated weather information and answered questions
  April 5:  The temporary Cullman NWR transmitter broadcasting at 162.450 MHz was replaced with a new permanent transmitter, restoring the original broadcast coverage area for this transmitter destroyed during the April 27th, 2011 Severe Weather Outbreak.
  March 2: A strong storm system produced six tornadoes and numerous reports of large hail up to the size of softballs. Two significant tornadoes impacted portions of Limestone and Madison counties producing extensive damage.
  February 22:  All Northern Alabama counties in the Huntsville Forecast Area were re-designated as Storm Ready.
  January 12: Dual Pol Radar Upgrade was completed at the Hytop, AL WSR 88D radar site.
2011 September 19:  Lincoln County TN was re-designated as StormReady.
  September 17:  National Weather Service (NWS) Huntsville was part of the University of Alabama at Huntsville's (UAH's) Weather Fest.  A day of weather information and activities at the UAH campus.
  May 5:  NWS Huntsville began its presence on Facebook.
  May 5:  NWS Huntsville began its presence on Facebook.
  April 27:  A historic tornado outbreak more deadly than the Super Outbreak of 1974, with 39 tornadoes (including 3 E-F5s, 4 EF-4s, and 12 EF-2s), impacted the Huntsville Forecast Area.  One hundred fatalities and ninety-four injuries were directly related to the tornadoes in the Huntsville Forecast Area alone.
  March 19:  Huntsville ended its 2nd snowiest winter season on record. The seasonal snowfall total was 14.3 inches.
  February 28:  A storm system moved through the Tennessee Valley producing widespread straight-line wind damage and a few embedded tornadoes.  An EF-2 tornado that tracked across Moore and Franklin Counties in Tennessee killed one person while injuring 4 others.
  February 11:  The University of Alabama campus in Huntsville was dedicated as Storm Ready.
  January 10 to 16:  Snow was measured on the ground at Huntsville for seven consecutive days from January 10th to 16th, which was the longest streak on record.
  January 9-10:  A powerful low pressure system brought very heavy snowfall to the area with locations in  northwestern Alabama reporting over a foot. The heavy snowfall shut down Huntsville and other portions of northern Alabama for a few days.
2010 December 24-25:  Two to locally seven inches of snowfall produced a white Christmas across northern Alabama.
  October 16:  NWS Huntsville participated in the University of Alabama at Huntsville's (UAH's) first Weather Fest.  A day of weather information and activities at the UAH campus.
  September 22:  The hottest summer recorded at Huntsville and the Muscle Shoals area ended.
  September 3:  Moore County TN was re-designated StormReady.
  April 23-25:  National Weather Service personnel from the Huntsville Forecast Office staffed a booth at the 3-day Panoply Arts Festival in Huntsville Alabama disseminating weather information and answering questions.
  April 24:  A powerful storm system produced one EF-4 tornado, two EF-3 tornadoes, and one EF-2 tornado across north central and northeast Alabama.
  February 8:  Three to six inches of snow fell across portions of northwestern Alabama and near the Tennessee state line in northern Alabama.
  January 21:  A powerful storm system produced a rare and significant severe weather event in January. This event produced two tornadoes (one strong EF-2 and another EF-1) and hail as big as baseballs. The EF-2 touched down in downtown Huntsville and produced significant damage.
2009 December 16:  Franklin county TN was re-designated as StormReady.
  December 8-9:  A slow moving storm system produced as much as four to eight inches of rainfall across following counties in northern Alabama: Madison, Morgan, Lawrence, Jackson, and DeKalb county.  This caused widespread and serious flash flooding and river flooding across Morgan and Madison counties in northern Alabama.
  April 24-26:  National Weather Service personnel from the Huntsville Forecast Office staffed a booth at the 3-day Panoply Arts Festival in Huntsville Alabama disseminating weather information and answering questions.
  April 19:  A severe weather event produced six tornadoes (3 EF-0s and 3 EF-1s) across Lawrence, Morgan, Marshall, and DeKalb counties, killing one person and injuring 14 others.
  April 12-13:  A Wake Low Event caused widespread wind damage across the Huntsville forecast area.
  April 10:  An EF-3 tornado moved through Marshall, southern Jackson, and west central DeKalb counties causing extensive and widespread damage.
  April 2:  A strong storm system produced several tornadoes across northern Alabama.
2008 December 10:  An EF-2 tornado affected central Jackson county.  This is unusually late for tornadoes to occur, but not unprecedented for severe weather in northern Alabama.
  May 8:  Seven tornadoes, from EF-0 to EF-2 in intensity, affected north central and northwest Alabama.
  May 4:  The FAA dedicated a new 228 foot tower at the Huntsville International Airport.  FAA Contract Weather Observers moved to the tower to conduct operations shortly afterward.
  April 25-27:  National Weather Service personnel from the Huntsville Forecast Office staffed a booth at the 3-day Panoply Arts Festival in Huntsville Alabama disseminating weather information and answering questions.
  Feb 6:  During the Super Tuesday Outbreak, two devastating EF-4 tornadoes ripped through Lawrence, Morgan, and Jackson counties.
2007 A Moderate to Exceptional Drought affected the Huntsville Forecast area and much of Southern Middle Tennessee.
  November 14:  Alabama joined the Community Rain/Hail/Snow Mesonet Network (COCORAHS).
  October 27National Weather Service (NWS) Huntsville began participating in the Jack Daniel's Barbeque Invitational.  Personnel staffed a booth at the event promoting weather safety and providing weather information.
  October 1: The NWS, including the Huntsville office, converted from county based warnings to storm based warnings.
  April 27-29:  National Weather Service personnel from the Huntsville Forecast Office staffed a booth at the 3-day Panoply Arts Festival in Huntsville Alabama disseminating weather information and answering questions.
  February 1:  The NWS replaced the old F-scale system for rating tornadoes with the new EF Scale rating system developed by Texas Tech University.
2006 A Moderate to Exceptional Drought affected the Huntsville Forecast area and much of Southern Middle Tennessee: Many locations across the Huntsville County Warning Area saw their driest year on record. At Huntsville, precipitation for the year was only 28.65 inches which was a remarkable 22.57 inches below normal. In fact, it beat out the previous driest year, 1925, by 8.53 inches!
  April 28-30:  National Weather Service personnel from the Huntsville Forecast Office staffed a booth at the 3-day Panoply Arts Festival in Huntsville Alabama disseminating weather information and answering questions.
2005 August 29:  Remnants of Hurricane Katrina brought heavy rain and tropical storm force wind gusts between 40 and 50 MPH to the Huntsville Forecast Area. One gust to 71 MPH was reported at the Muscle Shoals Airport.
  February 21:  Severe thunderstorms produced penny to softball size hail and wind damage across northern Alabama.
2004 December 1-9:  Following a wet November, eight to ten inches of rain fell mainly north of the Tennessee River. This caused widespread river flooding across much of the Tennessee River.  Especially hard hit were areas in northwestern Alabama.
  September 17:  Remnants of Hurricane Ivan produced copious rainfall totals between three and nine inches along with widespread flooding. Tropical storm force winds to just over 50 mph were experienced as well.
  Memorial Day Weekend:  A large squall line moved across the Huntsville Forecast Area causing widespread wind and tornado damage.  Significant damage occurred in and near McFarland Park along the Tennessee River.
  January 14:  The National Weather Service in Huntsville celebrated its first anniversary of operations as a local WFO.  U.S Representative Bud Cramer (D-AL) joined the festivities.
2003 November 5:  WFO Huntsville assumed forecast and warning responsibilities for Lincoln, Moore, and Franklin counties in Tennessee.
  June 24:  NOAA Weather Radio station WNG-642 in Arab went on the air.
  May 2:  A massive hail event occurred across the Tennessee Valley and produced widespread golf ball to baseball size hail. Hail as large as softballs fell in parts of Colbert and Lauderdale counties.
  January 14:  WFO Huntsville reopened at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC) building on the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) campus at 10am. WFO Huntsville then assumed forecasting and warning responsibility for the original CWA, plus Cullman County.
2002 December:  NOAA Weather Radio station WNG-554 was installed on Keith Springs Mountain in Franklin County, TN.
1999 June 28:  Six to eight inches of rain fell between midnight and 6 am causing widespread extensive flash flooding over southern portions of Huntsville.
1997 December 2:  WSO Huntsville transferred warning responsibility for its County Warning Area (CWA) to Weather Service Forecast Office (WSFO) Birmingham at 10am.  WSO Huntsville then became a "spindown" office.
  July 1:  Hytop radar became operational after a testing period.
  April 25:  Dome installed on new Hytop WSR-88D (NEXRAD) radar.
  April 8:  The ASOS at Northwest Alabama Regional Airport in Muscle Shoals was commissioned.
1996 October 23:  ASOS at Pryor Field in Decatur was commissioned.
  April 3:  NOAA Weather Radio station WWF-66 in Cullman was put on the air.
1995 May 18:  A devastating long track F4 tornado stayed on the ground for 39 miles across Limestone, Madison, and Jackson counties.  The Anderson Hills area was particularly hard hit by this tornado.
1994 December 16:  NOAA Weather Radio station WWF-44 near Henagar was put on the air.
  August 1:  ASOS at Huntsville International Airport was commissioned.
1993 March 12-14:  "Storm of the Century" dumped up to 17" of snow on the Tennessee Valley.
1991 WSR-74C radar at WSO Huntsville received Doppler upgrade.
1989 November 15:  A F4 tornado struck South Huntsville during evening rush hour. Tragically, it left great destruction in its wake in the Airport Road area, while killing 21 people and injuring 463 others.
1985 January 21:  Huntsville tied its coldest low temperature ever recorded of eleven degrees below zero Fahrenheit.
1980s Early 1980s:  AFOS computer system was installed, replaced facsimile and teletype machines.
1978 March 20: Huntsville experienced the end of its coldest winter season on record. The average temp was 35.4 Fahrenheit over the entire winter period.
1977
March 4:  NOAA Weather Radio station KIH-57 in Florence went on the air. WSR-74C radar installed at WSO Huntsville, replacing the older WSR-3 radar.
1976 January 14:  NOAA Weather Radio station KIH-20 was put on the air in Huntsville.
1974 April 3:  The "Super Outbreak" of tornadoes hit the eastern U.S. Approximately 60 people were killed and hundreds more were injured in the Tennessee Valley alone.
1973 March 16:  Major flooding occurred across the Tennessee Valley, with extensive damage in Huntsville and the Shoals area. Over 50,000 acres of farmland flooded in Madison County alone.
1970 October 9:  U.S. Weather Bureau became the National Weather Service (NWS).
  October 3:  ESSA became the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
1967 October 29:  WBAS Huntsville moved to the new Huntsville-Madison County airport near Madison, coinciding with the opening of  the airport; WSR-3 radar moved with office.
1966 January 30: Some of the coldest temperatures on record across the present day Huntsville Forecast Area were experienced during an Arctic outbreak in 1966. During this Arctic outbreak, Huntsville experienced its coldest low temperature ever recorded as it dropped to -11 degrees Fahrenheit. Also during this Arctic Outbreak, the state of AL experienced its coldest temperature on record of -27 degrees Fahrenheit in the New Market community.
1965 July 13:  U.S. Weather Bureau consolidated under the new Environmental Science Services Administration (ESSA), still under the Department of Commerce.
1964
March 19: Huntsville ended its snowiest winter season on record. The official snowfall total for the whole season was 24.1 inches.
1963 December 31:  Heavy snowstorm hit the area, dumping over 17" of snow on Huntsville.
1958 October 31:  Weather Bureau office opened in Huntsville at the Municipal airport. WSR-3 radar installed.
1954 July 15:  Huntsville Municipal Airport reclassified as "SAWRS" station. Official observations for Huntsville-Madison area temporarily taken in the city of Madison.
1945 November 21:  Huntsville observing site moved yet again - this time to the Huntsville Municipal Airport on the south side of town; classified as a "SA" station.
1941 February 21:  Huntsville observations site moved to the Texaco station just south of downtown.
1940 U.S. Weather Bureau is transferred to the Department of Commerce.
1937 January 1:  Huntsville-Madison area observations moved to Huntsville's Alabama Power Company building.
1932 March 21:  Tornadoes raked across North Alabama and South Tennessee, killing over 60 and injuring over 600.
1920 April 20:  Tornado outbreak hit the Southeast United States killing over 50 and injuring hundreds in Northern Alabama.
1907 January 1:  A continuous record of temperatures began in the Huntsville-Madison area, first taken in the city of Madison.
1905 February 14: The Muscle Shoals community experienced its coldest temperature of thirteen degrees below zero Fahrenheit.
1897 March:  Major flooding occurred along the Tennessee River.  Highest crest on record of 32.5 feet occurred on the Tennessee River at Florence and resulting river flooding washes numerous bridges away.
1894 A continuous record of precipitation began in the Huntsville-Madison area, first taken in the city of Madison.
1893 A continuous record of temperatures and precipitation began in the Shoals area.
1890 U.S. Weather Bureau became a part of the Department of Agriculture.
1885 June 1:  Cooperative observations began at Valley Head in Dekalb County, the longest-running cooperative site in the Huntsville CWA.
1871 June:  Observations briefly resumed at an unknown location in Huntsville, lasting through October of 1877.
1870 February 9:  United States Weather Bureau established under Army Signal Corps.
1867 March 15:  Major flood on the Tennessee River; highest crest ever recorded on the river at Whitesburg.
1831 January:  First record of weather observations in Huntsville, taken at an unknown location. These last through December of 1837.

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