NOAA All-Hazards Weather Radio
Voluntary Recall of Some Oregon Scientific Weather Radios (click for more information)
 

Recent NOAA Weather Radio News: 

  • Voluntary Recall of Some Oregon Scientific Weather Radios (click for more information)
  • June 1st, 2012  -  Severe Thunderstorm (SVR)/Tornado warnings (TOR) and Severe Weather Statements (SVS) only for Walker and Winston counties were added to the NWR broadcast of the Cullman NWR transmitter 162.450 MHz.  The SVR and TOR  short-fused warning products will be tone and SAME alerted.
  • June 1st, 2012 -  Severe Thunderstorm (SVR)/Tornado warnings (TOR) and Severe Weather Statements (SVS) only for Morgan and Blount counties were added to the NWR broadcast of the Arab NWR transmitter 162.525 MHz.  The SVR and TOR short-fused warning products will be tone and SAME alerted.
  • April 5, 2012 - The temporary Cullman NWR transmitter broadcasting at 162.450 was relocated and replaced with a new permanent transmitter, restoring the original broadcast coverage area for this transmitter.

Click on a transmitter site on the map below to get more information, or scroll down to your county for a list of available transmitters.

NOAA Weather Radios in the Huntsville Forecast Area Winchester NOAA Weather Radio Broadcast Area Fort Payne NOAA Weather Radio Broadcast Area Huntsville NOAA Weather Radio Broadcast Area Florence (Crooked Oak) NOAA Weather Radio Broadcast Area Cullman NOAA Weather Radio Broadcast Area Arab NOAA Weather Radio Broadcast Area
Arab, AL Cullman, AL Florence/Crooked Oak, AL
Fort Payne/Henagar, AL Huntsville, AL Winchester, TN
 
County FIPS/SAME Code Transmitter Frequency (MHz) Call Sign
Colbert 001033 Florence (Crooked Oak), AL 162.475 KIH-57
Cullman 001043

Arab, AL
Cullman, AL

162.525
162.450

WNG-642
WWF-66

DeKalb 001049

Arab, AL
Fort Payne (Henagar), AL

162.525
162.500

WNG-642
WWF-44

Franklin (AL) 001059 Florence (Crooked Oak), AL 162.475 KIH-57
Franklin (TN) 047051 Winchester, TN
Beechgrove, TN
162.525
162.475
WNG-554
WXK-63
Jackson 001071

Arab, AL
Fort Payne (Henagar), AL
Huntsville, AL
Winchester, TN

162.525
162.500
162.400
162.525

WNG-642
WWF-44
KIH-20
WNG-554

Lauderdale 001077

Florence (Crooked Oak), AL
Clifton, TN

162.475
162.500

KIH-57
WZ2-506

Lawrence 001079 Florence (Crooked Oak), AL
Huntsville, AL

162.475
162.400

KIH-57
KIH-20

Limestone 001083 Huntsville, AL 162.400 KIH-20
Lincoln 047103

Huntsville, AL
Winchester, TN
Lawrenceburg, TN

162.400
162.525
162.425

KIH-20
WNG-554
WWF-84

Madison 001089

Arab, AL
Huntsville, AL
Winchester, TN

162.525
162.400
162.525

WNG-642
KIH-20
WNG-554

Marshall 001095

Arab, AL
Fort Payne (Henagar), AL
Huntsville, AL

162.525
162.500
162.400

WNG-642
WWF-44
KIH-20

Moore 047127

Winchester, TN
Beechgrove, TN

162.525
162.475
WNG-554
WXK-63
Morgan

001103

Arab, AL*
Huntsville, AL

162.525
162.400

WNG-642
KIH-20

* Only Severe Thunderstorm Warnings and Tornado Warnings are transmitted.
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NOAA All-Hazards Weather Radio Help Links
 
Six Ways to Get the Most Out of Your NOAA All-Hazards Weather Radio:
  • Check your weather radio receiver each Wednesday between 11 AM and 12 PM for the routine weekly test to ensure that your receiver is in good working order.   (Note: In cases of inclement weather, the weekly test may be postponed till the next good weather day.)
  • Make sure you have your weather radio receiver on the correct channel for your area corresponding to the correct frequency. (i.e., 162.400=channel 1, 162.425= channel 2, etc.)
  • Place your weather radio near an exterior window facing the direction of the nearest weather radio transmitter. (Transmitters are located on Monte Sano in Huntsville, near Crooked Oak in southern Colbert County, near Henagar in DeKalb County, and in Cullman, Arab, and Winchester. Click here to view a map of area transmitters.)
  • Pull your weather radio antenna all the way out to get the best reception. If you are close to 40 miles from the transmitter, you might have to purchase a small external antenna to ensure that your signal is strong enough to alert your radio.
  • Change out your batteries at least twice a year--just like you would do with a smoke detector--to ensure your radio will work if you lose electrical power.
  • Double-check that appropriate county FIPS codes have been entered correctly into your weather radio to ensure proper warnings are received. It is recommended that you program in at least a one county buffer zone especially to the west, southwest and south of your county. This could provide extra lead time if a warning is issued for an adjacent county.

Frequently Asked Questions About NOAA All-Hazards Weather Radios

 
What is NOAA All-Hazards Weather Radio (NWR)?

NWR is a service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the Department of Commerce. NWR provides continuous broadcasts of the latest weather information directly from each Warning & Forecast Office (WFO) across the country. Weather messages are recorded and run in a cycle lasting an average of around four minutes, and are updated frequently throughout the day.

When severe weather occurs, routine broadcasting will be interrupted to provide the listener with frequent updates on severe weather warnings or statements relative to each listening area. When a severe weather warning is issued and you are within about 40 miles of a transmitter, specially equipped receivers will alert, with warning and safety information following the alert. NWR is now the fastest way to get your warnings. New technology used by the National Weather Service (NWS) enables warnings to be broadcast over NWR just a few seconds after they are issued, adding valuable lead-time to potentially life-saving warnings.

 
Can't I just tune in with the radio I already have? Where can I get a NOAA All-Hazards Weather Radio?
Weather radio broadcasts on seven high-band frequencies ranging from 162.4 to 162.55 MHz, which are too high for most standard radios to receive. This is why you need a special "weather radio" to receive the broadcast. You can get weather radios at most common electronics stores for as little as $20, and many grocery stores around the Tennessee Valley offer weather radios as well. You can get more information about buying a weather radio by clicking here.
 
Am I able to receive NWR broadcasts at my location?
NWR broadcasts can usually be heard as far away as 40 miles from a transmitter site, and at times at further distances. The effective range depends on many factors, including transmitter power, height of the antenna, terrain, quality of the receiver and atmospheric conditions. The National Weather Service Office in Huntsville broadcasts from 6 transmitters located throughout north Alabama and southern middle Tennessee. Click here to determine which transmitter(s) you should be able to receive.
 
How do I know my weather radio is programmed correctly?

NWS Huntsville usually conducts our routine weekly test each Wednesday between 11 AM and 12 PM (except in cases of inclement weather). If you do not receive the test, you should check your radio to see if it is programmed properly and tuned to the closest available broadcast. If you need further assistance, please contact our office.

 
Who is that person on NOAA All-Hazards Weather Radio?
When you tune into NOAA Weather Radio, the “voice” you hear is actually computer generated speech.   This is a component of NWR called CRS, or Console Replacement System. CRS was designed to ensure the National Weather Service (NWS) will be able to meet the increasing demands of NWR programming.

The advantages to using CRS are numerous. First and foremost, CRS routes products to the affected NWR transmitter as soon as they are issued. There is no lag time after issuance, since recordings are no longer made. This is especially important during severe weather, as precious minutes will be added to each warning's "lead time." Automating these tasks also frees up NWS employees to devote more time to forecasts and operations. Also, old products are taken out of the broadcast cycle the moment they expire and/or are updated.

 
What is the programming schedule for NWR?

Programming on NWR will vary from office to office. Following is the normal programming schedule at NWS Huntsville. (The program schedule is similar for all 6 transmitters.)

  • Local and surrounding weather conditions are updated every hour.
  • Short term forecasts are broadcast when weather conditions warrant.
  • Local forecasts for the next seven days.
  • Local climatic summaries.
  • A regional weather synopsis or hazardous weather outlook.
  • Detailed station identification messages are broadcast once every hour.
  • The current local time is given every broadcast cycle.
  • Weekly warning alarm test messages are broadcast each Wednesday, usually between 11:00 a.m. & noon, weather permitting.
  • Regular programming will be interrupted during severe weather.
 
What products are alerted on NWR?

The following products are alerted using SAME codes and the 1050 hertz tone:

  • Tornado warnings
  • Severe thunderstorm warnings
  • Flash flood warnings
  • Winter weather warnings (discretionary) 
  • Tornado watches
  • Severe thunderstorm watches
  • Flash flood watches
  • Civil emergency messages
  • Routine weekly/monthly tests

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