Thunderstorms are common in Georgia. On average you can expect 45 to 55 days with thunderstorms each year. Personal injury and property damage can occur as a result of the many hazards thunderstorms produce...including lightning, hail, damaging wind (downburst or straight line), torrential flood-producing rainfall, and infrequent tornadoes.

What is a "Severe" Thunderstorm?

These are storms that produce large hail and/or wind gusts strong enough to cause damage. The National Weather Service has adopted criteria that must be met before a storm is classified as "severe":

  • wind gusts in excess of 57 miles an hour and/or
  • hail with a diameter of at least 1 inch (the size of quarter)


If you see hail the size of dimes or larger, or if you experience wind damage (including downed trees or power lines)...
contact the NWS toll free at 1-866-763-4466

or send us a report!

Reporting severe storms to the NWS helps us warn your neighbors "downstream"!


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Important terms to know

 

  • Severe Thunderstorm Watch: Conditions are favorable for the development of severe thunderstorms.
  • Severe Thunderstorm Warning: Thunderstorms with large hail or damaging wind have been reported by spotters or indicated by radar. Warnings indicate imminent danger to life and property to those in the path of the storm.



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    Did you know...

     

  • A typical thunderstorm lasts 30 minutes.
  • A special class of thunderstorm, called a "supercell", can last for hours and is often unusually violent.
  • Thunderstorms can occur at any time, but are most likely to occur in the afternoon and evening hours in the spring and summer.
  • The straight-line winds in a thunderstorm can exceed 100 mph and can be as damaging as a tornado.
  • Lightning can occur even when it is not raining.
  • Lightning causes an average of 93 deaths and 300 injuries in the United States each year.


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    What to do when thunderstorms threaten

     

  • Monitor weather reports on radio/television or National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio.
  • Postpone outdoor activity if a thunderstorm is imminent.
  • If caught outside in a thunderstorm, take shelter in a building or hardtop vehicle - do not take shelter under isolated trees, in sheds, or in a convertible vehicle.
  • Stay away from conductive objects, such as telephone lines, power lines, metal pipes and metal fences.
  • If inside, avoid using the telephone or other electrical appliances.

  • If you see hail the size of dimes or larger, or if you experience wind damage (including downed trees or power lines)...
    contact the NWS toll free at 1-866-763-4466

    or send us a report!

    Reporting severe storms to the NWS helps us warn your neighbors "downstream"!



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