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Hail Photos from North Georgia
March 15, 2008

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Just one day after the City of Atlanta was hit by a deadly tornado, severe thunderstorms and tornadoes returned to Georgia. These storms dealt the state another heavy blow as two people lost their lives and others were injured. Hail and high winds struck at least 40 counties. Survey teams from the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City confirmed 3 tornadoes - the worst being an EF3 killer that raked portions of Floyd, Polk and Bartow counties. Maximum winds with this storm were estimated as high as 150 mph.

Large hail fell in at least 35 counties across portions of northern and central Georgia.

in Fulton County...
From Tom Faber..."in north Fulton County about mid-way between Roswell and Norcross (near the intersection of Holcomb Bridge Rd and Nesbit Ferry Rd). The storm began at about 4:06PM and lasted about 10-12 minutes. 20 minutes after it began the sun was shining again! Most hail stones were on the order of 1-cm in diameter. A small percentage of the hail stones were much larger. The larger ones appeared to be a cluster of smaller ones frozen together rather than one large hail stone. Perhaps this is why they did no apparent damage to cars. The only damage I noted was small tree branches, twigs, and pine needles that were knocked down."

in Jasper County...
Storm spotters Clark Evans and Steve Martinaitis sent us this report from the Hillsboro Georgia area...
"We came upon the city at 6:50 pm EDT, shortly after a significant storm had passed through the city, and found significant hail along a three mile stretch from the center of Hillsboro, starting near the intersection of Hwy 11 and Tuene Lake Rd., and extending to the south along GA Highway 11 along the edge of the Natl. Wildlife Refuge.

In most spots, hail covered the ground an inch deep with slightly higher drifts in spots. Hwy. 11 was barely passable due to significant ice accumulations. Hail size was largely uniform across Hillsboro, maximized at near golf ball size, with a large number of pellets around half-dollar size. (Note that this size description is after a brief period of melting after hail fall.) I did not notice any damage related to the hail. "

in Hall County...
Storm spotter J. Beth Bowdoin sent us this report...
"Hail: 1.25 inch in diameter
Duration: approximately 3 minutes
Time: approximately 4:05 pm EST
Location: 5 miles north of Gainesville in Hall County, near Hwy 284 (Clarks Bridge Road) and B. Clark Road."

Meteorologist Melinda Ball sent us photos from near Road Atlanta. Photos taken by her friend Virginia and Jan Clifford.

Other photos...



Hail photos taken in Fulton, Hall and Jasper Counties ( click images to enlarge )
[ Photo taken near end of hail storm - Fulton County ]
Photo taken near end of hail storm - Fulton County.
[ Most hail stones were
                            on the order of 1-cm in diameter - Fulton County. ]
Most hail stones were on the order of 1-cm in diameter - Fulton County.
 [ Some of the larger hail stones - Fulton County. ]
Some of the larger hail stones - Fulton County.
[ Hail in hand - Jasper County ]
Hail in hand - Jasper County.
[ Hail in hand - Jasper County. ]
Hail in hand - Jasper County.
 [ Hail on the ground up to around an inch deep - Jasper County. ]
Hail on the ground up to around an inch deep - Jasper County.
[ Hail in hand - Hall County. ]
Hail in hand - Hall County.
[ Hail in hand - Hall County. ]
Hail in hand - Hall County.
[ Ominous cloud - Hall County. ]
Ominous cloud - Hall County.

 

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