Significant weather events collage
Understanding Rio Grande Valley Weather
Tips that Can Save Your Life and Protect Property

Compared with some parts of Texas, and the United States, some may say the Rio Grande Valley experiences little "weather". Large, destructive tornadoes or hailstones are not a routine springtime occurrence here as they are in North Texas. The classic Blues song, "Texas Flood", was not written for the Valley, but more likely for residents in Flash Flood Alley, an area of central Texas that includes the Balcones Escarpment and the cities of Austin, San Antonio, and San Angelo. The occasional blinding blizzards of Amarillo are never expected here, nor is significant ice accretion that brings down trees and power lines once every few winters in North and East Texas. Even hurricanes seem more likely to strike from Corpus Christi to Port Arthur rather than in Brownsville.

From the sound of it, then, the Valley should stay abreast of weather, but not worry about preparing for it, right? Wrong! In fact, it is because the Rio Grande Valley receives infrequent, truly hazardous weather that residents must be extremely vigilant. For while the "big one" may not come this year or next, something big inevitably will impact the growing population and unique cultural blend of the region. One only needs to look back to July, 2008, when Hurricane Dolly produced more than $2 billion in estimated property damage from flooding and wind. Or, a month later, when between 12 and 18 inches of rain fell in less than a week over the southwest corner of Starr County, causing millions of dollars in flood damage. Or, in March, 2008, when a 25,000 acre wildfire scarred the Burns Ranch in Jim Hogg County. The Valley even had a White Christmas in 2004, when the first snows in more than 100 years blanketed most areas.

Floods, Fires, Heatwaves, Hurricanes, Rip Currents, Lightning – they all have caused headache and heartache in the Valley. Fear cannot solve weather woes, but knowledge is power. The table below will link you to a growing list of local preparedness web pages and other tips to provide knowledge of unique weather in the Rio Grande Valley, and important tips to keep you and your family safe.

Stay safe this year and every year! The following information can help you prepare for weather hazards in Deep South Texas and the Rio Grande Valley anytime, and anywhere.

When to be Ready
Weather Type
June–October
Year Round
Year Round
May–October
Year Round
Year Round
December–February
Year Round
Year Round
Coming Soon! Fire Weather Safety

USA.gov is the U.S. government's official web portal to all federal, state and local government web resources and services.