NOAA's National Weather Service Recognizes Talladega County as a StormReady® County and Talladega Superspeedway as a StormReady® Supporter
Thursday, January 11, 2006

Talladega Superspeedway Logo

Officials from NOAA's National Weather Service have recognized Talladega County as a StormReady ® County and Tallladega SuperSpeedway as a StormReady ® Supporter. StormReady Supporter is a grass roots education program designed to aid businesses and schools in establishing severe weather safety plans and actively promoting weather awareness.

Officials from NOAA's National Weather Service have recognized Talladega County as a StormReady ® County and Tallladega SuperSpeedway as a StormReady ® Supporter. StormReady Supporter is a grass roots education program designed to aid businesses and schools in establishing severe weather safety plans and actively promoting weather awareness.

" StormReady Counties and Supporters are an important part of our mission of saving lives and property," said Brig. Gen. David L. Johnson, U.S. Air Force (Ret.), director of NOAA's National Weather Service. "When a severe weather watch or warning is issued, the public needs to understand what actions to take. Residents of Talladega County and visitors to the racetrack are vulnerable to the elements and need to plan for and be mindful of the weather.”

The StormReady Supporter program is part of StormReady. The nationwide community preparedness program uses a grassroots approach to help communities develop plans to handle local severe weather and flooding threats. The program is voluntary and provides communities with clear-cut advice from a partnership between local National Weather Service forecast offices and state and local emergency managers. StormReady started in 1999 with seven communities in the Tulsa, Okla., area. There are now more than 1,139 StormReady designations throughout the United States – including 23 StormReady Supporters. Alabama has 35 StormReady counties, five StormReady communities and five StormReady Supporters. Talladega County and Talladega Superspeedway are the newest county and supporter in Alabama.

National Weather Service, Emergency Managment, and Talladega SuperSpeedway Officials at the Talladega Superspeedway
National Weather Service, Emergency Managment, and
Talladega SuperSpeedway Officials at the Talladega Superspeedway

Steven Cooper, acting National Weather Service southern region director; Jim Stefkovich, meteorologist-in-charge of the Birmingham weather office; and Jason Wright, warning coordination meteorologist at the Birmingham office, presented a StormReady recognition letter, plaque, and two StormReady signs with renewal date stickers to Talladega County Commission Chairman Kelvin Cunningham. They presented a StormReady Supporter plaque to Rick Humphrey, Vice President/General Manager of Talladega Superspeedway, during this special ceremony at the infield media center at 10 am today.

To be recognized as StormReady, a community must:

  • establish a 24-hour warning point and emergency operations center;
  • have multiple ways to receive severe weather warnings and forecasts and to alert the public;
  • create a system that monitors weather conditions locally;
  • promote public readiness through community outreach and education; and
  • develop a formal hazardous weather plan, which includes training severe weather spotters and holding emergency exercises.

StormReady Supporters are local entities, such as businesses, hospitals, malls, schools, county extension agencies, etc., that promote the principles and guidelines of the StormReady program through severe weather safety and awareness plans—but do not have the resources to meet full StormReady requirements.

Entities interested in becoming StormReady Counties or Supporters should contact their local National Weather Service warning coordination meteorologist for further information about the program.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, an agency of the U.S. Commerce Department, is celebrating 200 years of science and service to the nation. From the establishment of the Survey of the Coast in 1807 by Thomas Jefferson to the formation of the Weather Bureau and the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries in the 1870s, much of America's scientific heritage is rooted in NOAA.

NOAA is dedicated to enhancing economic security and national safety through the prediction and research of weather and climate-related events and information service delivery for transportation, and by providing environmental stewardship of our nation's coastal and marine resources. Through the emerging Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), NOAA is working with its federal partners, more than 60 countries and the European Commission to develop a global monitoring network that is as integrated as the planet it observes, predicts and protects.


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