On Sunday, May 20, an annular solar eclipse is going to occur in the United States for the first time since 1994.  An annular eclipse occurs when the moon passes directly in front of the sun, but the lunar disk is not quite wide enough to cover the entire sun.  At maximum, the moon forms a "black hole" in the center of the sun.  The “path of annularity” is a strip about 300 km wide and thousands of km long.  It will stretch from China and Japan, across the Pacific Ocean, to the middle of North America.  In the United States, the afternoon sun will become a luminous ring in places such as Reno, Nevada; Albuquerque, New Mexico, Hereford, Texas; and Lubbock, Texas.  Outside of this relatively narrow zone, the eclipse will be partial.  Provided weather conditions are favorable, observers across the Texas and Oklahoma Panhandles will see a crescent-shaped sun as the moon passes by off-center.
 
In the image below, the red line indicates the center of the eclipse and the blue lines indicate the northern and southern extent of the annular eclipse.  If you live within these lines, you will be able to see the annular eclipse.  If you outside of the blue lines, a partial eclipse will still be visible.
 
ECLIPSE TIMES

Amarillo
Start of partial eclipse at 7:29 p.m. CT
Maximum eclipse at 8:34 p.m. CT
End of partial eclipse at 9:33 p.m. CT
Sunset at 8:49 p.m. CT

Hereford
Start of partial eclipse at 7:29 p.m. CT
Start of annular eclipse at 8:33 p.m. CT
Maximum eclipse at 8:34 p.m. CT
End of annular eclipse at 8:35 p.m. CT
End of partial eclipse at 9:33 p.m. CT
Sunset at 8:50 p.m. CT
*Total annular eclipse time will be 2 minutes and 1 second

Look up eclipse times for your location

 
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
NASA Annular Eclipse
NASA Eclipse Eye Safety

Check the forecast!

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